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KDE Will Now Let You Easily Disable Offline Updates, More KWin Crash Fixes

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  • #11
    Maybe "Boot-time updates" would be clearer. That might be useful if you can guarantee the update process will always result in a bootable system.

    Edit: actually, two fixes I'd like are context menus not being behind notifications and not having context menus get closed by tooltips.
    Last edited by ResponseWriter; 17 April 2021, 01:48 PM.

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    • #12
      My suggestion is to use what, at least, seems correct to me: "Cache updates".

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      • #13
        After reading both blog posts and comments I am now confused at what "Offline Updates" is supposed to imply.

        Am I to infer that it updates at only installed during boot up like Windows 10 or something?

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        • #14
          Originally posted by angrypie View Post
          Shave your head and tattoo the 14 words in your chest in Fraktur. You can also drink milk or make the OK gesture in social settings.
          You tried too hard.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
            Offline Updates needs a different name. To me that sounds like getting updates from a USB stick, DVD, or some other offline, non-networked source; not applying online, network sourced updates upon reboot (which is a terrific feature to add). The feature is literally "Apply Online Sourced Updates On Reboot" so calling it "Offline Updates" is a bit misleading.

            Update Upon Reboot
            Restart Update Service
            Something Along Those Lines

            I used to live miles from an internet connection and had to drive a laptop and a 2TB USB drive to use apt-mirror to clone Debian mirrors to do actual Offline Updates to a non-networked PC.
            They are called offline updates because the updates are applied offline. The process is divided into two, in the first step the updates are downloaded, as it always has, in the second step the PC asks for a restart to apply the updates and in this phase the system is offline. I understand it can be misunderstood ...

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post

              They are called offline updates because the updates are applied offline. The process is divided into two, in the first step the updates are downloaded, as it always has, in the second step the PC asks for a restart to apply the updates and in this phase the system is offline. I understand it can be misunderstood ...
              Depends on the person's definition of offline. I normally use it to describe network or internet connectivity and y'all are using it to describe the system itself. IMHO, the former is common among everyone whereas the latter is only common among groups of nerds. I get it being named like that, I just think it is such a non-descriptive name that it can be mistaken for what it does as this thread has demonstrated.

              Look at it like this: Offline Updates or Update Upon Reboot -- without knowing anything else, which title is more obvious as to what will happen?

              That's why I think some form of "Update Upon Reboot" is more apt of a name for this. That name informs the person of a lot: that an update will occur, when it will occur, and how it'll be triggered. It's also similar to how Windows names the same feature as well as the Reboot icon in the menus could pick up an Update Badge just like Windows does. That's even better. No matter what OS Casual User is on it behaves in a similar and consistent manner with little guesswork as to what is going to happen.

              And I think this is a great feature to have. I reboot the second after updating anything. Usually unnecessary, but I like the piece of mind. Deferring it until the system is in a more minimal state to hopefully ensure better updates and stability? Cool. Especially if it triggers things like zsys or Snapper snapshots in the process.

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              • #17
                OK, after reading the comments I'm even more confused; now I understand what "offline updates" means but... what the heck does KDE have to do with updates? It's a desktop! The distribution's package manager controls updating the system, not KDE.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by alcalde View Post
                  OK, after reading the comments I'm even more confused; now I understand what "offline updates" means but... what the heck does KDE have to do with updates? It's a desktop! The distribution's package manager controls updating the system, not KDE.
                  https://userbase.kde.org/Discover

                  KDE includes a package manager front end that does cover your system package managers.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by oiaohm View Post

                    https://userbase.kde.org/Discover

                    KDE includes a package manager front end that does cover your system package managers.
                    Thanks. This looks as bad an idea as when they had their own web browser.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by alcalde View Post
                      Thanks. This looks as bad an idea as when they had their own web browser.
                      https://apps.kde.org/konqueror/ Sorry to say they still do have their own web browser. So its not when they had their own web browser as being history its current fact the KDE application suite still has a webbrowser.

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