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  • dragon321
    replied
    Originally posted by finalzone View Post

    GNOME Classic retains the traditional layout too.
    You're right but it's only layout. Core applications still don't look very traditional. I guess nothing stops you from using more traditional equivalents (like Nemo/Caja in place of Nautilus etc.).

    Leave a comment:


  • DanL
    replied
    Originally posted by Jumbotron View Post
    Yeah.....like us GTK/Gnome fans warning KDE fanbois and C++ lovers for decades they were going to get burned one day by Trolltech and and whoever bought them in the future...( cough, QT, cough cough )
    Who got burned? KDE generally doesn't use LTS releases of Qt, so the recent licensing change was not as big a deal as you zealots would like us to believe. Furthermore, if something drastic does happen with licensing, KDE (et al) can fork Qt in the worst case scenario.

    But please, keep spreading FUD and telling us that the sky is falling for a couple more decades. It's really comical.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mez'
    replied
    Originally posted by ed31337 View Post
    My DE is a bit of a hodgepodge consisting of Wayfire, the Wayfire panel (wf-shell), xfce terminal, and GNOME's (?) Nemo file manager.
    Nemo was created (and I suppose is still maintained) by the Cinnamon team.
    I saw you mention wayfire somewhere in a forum a few weeks ago so I went and tested it (since it has compiz effects and wobbly windows in particular and my relation with Gnome is at a bear it-dislike it level, I would try anything at this point).
    It didn't even feel alpha software though (v0.7). So slow and buggy. Apps would start or not, then appear after 15-20 seconds. When I minimized a window, I couldn't find it back (not appearing in the panel or anywhere) and had to kill and restart it to have it active again. There might have been some shortcuts I was not aware of though. Might also be the Manjaro implementation as well. Still seem like a long work in progress. Compiz-like effects are mostly working though.
    To top it off, it screwed up pipewire, I had to revert to pulseaudio and back to pipewire to get back my output devices and sound as no other usual solution worked.

    Leave a comment:


  • ed31337
    replied
    Originally posted by JackLilhammers View Post
    ed31337
    What's your setup? I mean which distribution, DE, etc. I've been trying to use a rpi as desktop for quite some time, but always failed
    I started with Sakaki's ARM64 Gentoo image and then upgraded that to all the latest stuff using the GenPi64 and upstream Gentoo repositories. The transition from Sakaki to GenPi64 wasn't the easiest thing in the world, but I'm very pleased with my end result. Hopefully someday the GenPi64 project will release a good, up-to-date desktop image so people can just flash and go, but they're not quite there yet (they have an alpha image, but it's pretty barebones so far).

    My DE is a bit of a hodgepodge consisting of Wayfire, the Wayfire panel (wf-shell), xfce terminal, and GNOME's (?) Nemo file manager.

    Leave a comment:


  • ed31337
    replied
    Originally posted by Monsterovich View Post

    You benchmark GPU framerate in glxgears? Oookay.

    glxgears' purpose is to check if graphics work at all. Use glmark2 instead.
    Oh cool, I'll have to give that a try sometime. I just used glxgears because it's what I have and seemed to be what everybody else was quoting on the Internet (at least in Raspberry Pi circles). It does seem like a too simplistic test though.

    FWIW, playing MegaGlest runs much smoother for me on Wayland than Xorg, which is what really mattered to me. Unfortunately, I don't know how to get it to display FPS to objectively compare how much better it is though.

    I never had playback tearing in Xorg except in the case of Firefox but V-sync was disabled in about:config for some reason.
    On x86, Xorg screen tearing seemed to be a non-issue for me, but on Raspberry Pi 4, it's been a persistent problem for everybody.

    Even xfce4?
    I'm still using the xfce4 terminal program (which works fine on Wayland), but I've ditched the xfce window manager and panel in favor of Wayfire and it's equivalents. Wayfire has some minor bugs and minor uglies here and there, but for the most part it is still very usable. I haven't had any desire to boot back into Xorg/XFCE4 at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • JackLilhammers
    replied
    ed31337
    What's your setup? I mean which distribution, DE, etc. I've been trying to use a rpi as desktop for quite some time, but always failed

    Leave a comment:


  • mppix
    replied
    Originally posted by Monsterovich View Post
    But it does and I've explained how it affects other DEs.

    Wayland can't even compete with Xorg which was invented decades ago. We all know why: Wayland is an embodiment of NIH syndrome. It's not a proper replacement for Xorg: Wayland added more problems and solved almost none of them. The lack of compatibility with Xorg is not making Wayland look better. The only thing that replace Xorg is another Xorg (X12) which would have backward compatibility with X11. This seems like a solution to me.

    I don't know much about MacOS but Win10 UI is fine. Even Microsoft has learned from their mistakes after Win8 but Gnome just can't.

    It's not just about bugs. It's about how fast I can deploy and develop GTK applications on Windows. Qt did a good job on this matter.

    I don't pay for Qt either.
    Live is dreadful... too much scary progress.

    Leave a comment:


  • mppix
    replied
    Originally posted by flower View Post
    Wayland won't kill xfce
    they just need another wm and they are working on it. next steps to make it wayland compatible will happen at gsoc.

    i am very much looking forward to it
    .. kill xfce as you know it ..
    Pls read the context

    Leave a comment:


  • Monsterovich
    replied
    Originally posted by ed31337 View Post
    glxgears went from around 200fps to 2000fps!
    You benchmark GPU framerate in glxgears? Oookay.

    glxgears' purpose is to check if graphics work at all. Use glmark2 instead.

    Originally posted by ed31337 View Post
    playback no longer has the screen tearing exhibited on Xorg.
    I never had playback tearing in Xorg except in the case of Firefox but V-sync was disabled in about:config for some reason.

    Originally posted by ed31337 View Post
    Wayland is backward compatible with X11. Load up the Xwayland module and boom, you can run all your old X11 apps.
    Even xfce4?
    Last edited by Monsterovich; 31 March 2021, 05:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ed31337
    replied
    Originally posted by Monsterovich View Post
    Wayland can't even compete with Xorg which was invented decades ago. We all know why: Wayland is an embodiment of NIH syndrome. It's not a proper replacement for Xorg: Wayland added more problems and solved almost none of them.
    Wayland solved a lot of my problems. Xorg was slow and laggy. And it's memory footprint was pretty hefty too. Wayland is fast and snappy. It's memory footprint is about the same as Xorg, but that's only because I still have to load the Xwayland module for a few of my apps.

    I know, a lot of folks are probably using fast x86 processors with fast video cards and double digit GB's of RAM, so these were never problems for you on Xorg. But for me on a Raspberry Pi 4 with only 4GB of RAM, Wayland has been fantastic. glxgears went from around 200fps to 2000fps! Video playback no longer has the screen tearing exhibited on Xorg.

    The lack of compatibility with Xorg is not making Wayland look better. The only thing that replace Xorg is another Xorg (X12) which would have backward compatibility with X11.
    Wayland is backward compatible with X11. Load up the Xwayland module and boom, you can run all your old X11 apps.

    Leave a comment:

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