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GNOME 40 Released With Many Improvements

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  • Originally posted by JackLilhammers View Post
    markus40
    I'm not talking about every little detail.
    The few things I've mentioned are not details and are not specific to KDE. Quite the contrary.
    Every desktop has them, except Gnome.
    Sorry, I was maybe a little to pedantic in my response to you. Your requests are very reasonable and, indeed they are almost universal.

    All I can say is I used Gnome 1.x and Gnome 2.x from start to end, I used Gnome 3 from the beginning. I didn't need to adjust to no activity icons, the window handling and no desktop icons. I used plank under Xorg and switched to Wayland as soon as I found DashtoDock and switched to vertical layout a few years ago, also no adjustment it felt right. Now I ditch DashtoDock because of the new overview. I guess I just go with the flow and like it. Maybe because I'm used to adapting to lots of different desktops. I've a work MacBook, a work Lenovo laptop with Windows 10, I used to use many Unix desktops in the past. Openlook, CDE, Iris. Even under the command-line I have to adapt to the quirks of putty, terminal under macOS nowadays etc.

    It is not that I don't understand the frustration of missing things. I have that too when I'm not on Linux. I just don't feel it under Gnome.

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    • I have tried the Fedora 34 Beta, and Gnome is better than ever,on my system is more responsible and very intuitive and really nice eye candy, BUT I CAN'T USE IT! It's faster but not faster than KDE, but what really makes not using is because it's like a beauty with no brains. I use my computer to work, and Gnome Search is very limited,barelly show a few files, and there's no way to sort the results or easily preview without destroying the search tag. But what makes me really upset is the fact that Gnome Calendar, or Evolution for that matter does not search entries more than 2 weeks forward making the calendar pretty useless, and the fact that the fancy notification calendar does not show html links also makes it pretty bad productivity, in KDE the calendar can show clickable htmls links that can open Zoom app on time for a meeting, etc etc

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      • Originally posted by markus40 View Post
        It is not that I don't understand the frustration of missing things. I have that too when I'm not on Linux. I just don't feel it under Gnome.
        Good for you!
        For me it's kind of the opposite, I miss things on every platform and I deeply envy those like you
        If I had the money I'd have 1 gaming rig with dual booting, 1 laptop 100% linux compatible with dual booting (or multi), 1 macbook m1 (air or pro), 1 lattepanda, a couple of SBC...
        Unfortunately I'm still not paid enough to have that many machines to play with

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        • Originally posted by Mario Junior View Post
          You call it instantly? Open the same folder with Dolphin and see the absurd difference.
          They both use FFMPEG for generating the thumbnails so there possibly cannot be a difference. Maybe you don't realize that both file managers also cache the thumbnails on the disk, so you might be comparing a cached folder view on Dolphin to uncached view on Nautilus.

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          • Originally posted by Nocifer View Post
            In Gnome you can press Ctrl+Shift+e and you'll get an input prompt for emoji. Simply type in what you want, be it e.g. "smile" or ":-)", and then press Space and you'll get your input converted to an emoji. If at that point you want to see more choices or explore similar patterns, just press Space for a second time and you'll get exactly what you're asking for. There's also an equivalent widget for Unicode symbols with Ctrl+Shift+u.
            That exists in Xfce4 as well, via the iBus applet. While it works, it's highly counter-intuitive, and if I'm being candid, it's fugly.

            For years there's been the compose key to produce for example £ via tapping WIN followed by L and - to produce the combined character, or O C for ©, or T M for ™ etc. So it stands to reason that to access the emoji codepoints in a similarly intuitive way via the already well-defined and supported interface, then there should be compose key sequences for the emoji as well.

            The iBus app is just an ugly example of NIH as far as I'm concerned. Ugly defined as popping a grey box with [e ] some random place on the screen with no obvious way to get rid of it, no obvious way to complete it, no help on the iBus widget, and none of the top 10 search results on Google even provide useful help. And if you do click the iBus icon - it pops a dozen stacked grey boxes on the screen 20px above the cursor with the chosen locale language name short form (ie "EN") in them which much each be clicked in turn to dismiss them, while providing no useful function whatsoever. And the iBus icon colour can't be set, so it fails to meet HIG guidelines since it can't be set to a visible colour. How it managed to make it into a release in its current form beggars belief.

            For anyone configuring a distro's desktop to use the iBus app - provide some documentation for users so they can determine how to use it, and blacklist its icon in the notification area. It will work just fine without the icon, whereas the icon is nothing but a hazard to users.
            Last edited by linuxgeex; 27 March 2021, 02:18 PM.

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            • Originally posted by reba View Post
              Marble is limited and doesn't support HiDPI too well (and even worse, it uses nearest neighbor scaling).
              For comparison, OsmAnd uses vectors.

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              • Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                Marble is limited and doesn't support HiDPI too well (and even worse, it uses nearest neighbor scaling).
                For comparison, OsmAnd uses vectors.



                Edit: Oh, sorry, I think I only just understood hat you meant.
                You meant the displayed graphic is first rendered on a "normal" resultion and then scaled up to match HiPDI instead or rendering in HiDPI directly, therefore giving you scaling artefacts?
                That might be but I cannot test as I don't have a HiDPI display / run everything at 100% scaling.
                Last edited by reba; 28 March 2021, 01:28 AM.

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                • Originally posted by curfew View Post
                  They both use FFMPEG for generating the thumbnails so there possibly cannot be a difference. Maybe you don't realize that both file managers also cache the thumbnails on the disk, so you might be comparing a cached folder view on Dolphin to uncached view on Nautilus.
                  Implying nautilus also cache the thumbnails...

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                  • Originally posted by sarmad View Post

                    You are wrong. Gnome 3 allowed virtual workspaces on external monitors via a setting, and that didn't change in Gnome 40. Multi monitor support in Gnome 40 is degraded, not improved, with external monitors and virtual workspaces both sitting on the same axis, compared to the previous situation where physical screens sit on the horizontal axis while virtual ones sit on the vertical axis. It's amazing how so many people can't see what's wrong with workspaces and physical screens both sitting on the same axis.
                    To be fair, I only use Gnome on my university laptop, and barely (It usually just boots up my Qemu freeBSD VM with CDE and I work there 95% of the time). I only know that whatever goes to the secondary monitor, can only be one window and will use all the screen, so I always piled everything in the primary, with the odd Discord and Spotify in workspaces below. I'll check out how to change it if you say it's possible (or see the differences: it is an Arch installation and might have moved to 40 already). Main computer uses Gentoo, and Gnome while it works, tends to end bugging out on non systemd installs. Plus compiling it takes just a little bit more time than something like I3, CDE or Xfce4, specially on a 5 year old laptop, so not whiling to install it on my main computer :P

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                    • So it already arrived to Arch, and for what I can see.... It didn't change anything. I am not sure if it's because after an upgrade it recycles the old settings, but the version it reports is 40.0.0, but it looks, behaves and tastes exactly the same as 3.0. Literally the only difference is that my Wallpaper was gone and I had to select a different one.

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