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GNOME 40 Beta Released With Many Improvements

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Mez' View Post
    They need to believe they use "The Best" to justify their choice and feel confident about it.
    It's not about "the best", it's about trashing "the worst", aka GNOME.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by cynic View Post

      that's one of the changes that scares me the most, being used to vertical layout.

      btw, what's the rationale to say that horizontal is better or worse than vertical, beside personal preference?
      I think horizontal is preferred by Gnome designers because left/right swipes are common among tablet devices for home screen/app switching. And in that sense I get it. Scrolling content is already taken by up/down swipes, so requiring some context for a workspace switch is one overload they could eliminate.

      However I'm a horizontal multi-monitor desktop user and vertical workspaces make more sense to me. I already have multiple monitors and therefore apps arranged conceptually on the X axis. I'm using a mouse to navigate, so combined with the workspace indicator extension, I can use the scroll wheel with only a finger flick to change the "app content" of a vertical workspace on a particular monitor. On the desktop I have more monitor real estate, and my brain is usually in work mode, so arranging monitors + workspaces in a 2D grid is more powerful and efficient.
      Last edited by nranger; 25 February 2021, 10:35 AM.

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      • #33
        I use Gnome since 1998, I used Red Hat 6.x (I believe), then Mandrake (7/8?), then Fedora, then seven years Gentoo which I copied from hard disk to hard disk, from new device to new device without reinstalling. Until there was a few months of pain with every emerge. Then Fedora for a moment. But after two releases I wanted a rolling release again. Now a happy Arch user for more than seven years already. I use Gnome on my laptops exclusively, But I use Openbox on my server which does many tasks, but the main one is media server and emulation machine hooked on my living room TV. I use Nautilus, ssh, rdesptop/Xrdpc to access my server on the fly. But also a lot command-line tools when it is more convenient. I automate everything that I do more than twice and is time/manual intensive. My daily job is dealing/supporting applications on Linux all around the world.

        I like Gnome, I'm looking forward to the new Gnome-shell and think I can ditch most extensions with this new release. I like Wayland and it works okay for me. Furthermore, I like Pulseaudio, but also Pipewire, although it has still many rough edges for me to use it as daily driver. People who dislike Wayland have forgotten how X was on Linux around the time it stopped being XFree86. The people who have developed Wayland have given you the X server (Xorg) which you put on a pedestal.

        I never could install OpenSuse, Debian or Ubuntu without some problem. I tried KDE and other desktops from time to time but never can get use to them and/or they have quirks like crashing or using a lot CPU. I use OSX on my work Macbook and dislike it with passion. I think Windows 10 get a lot of slack, a lot my applications I use on my work Windows machine I can build up when maximizing, or freeze for seconds. If Gnome did this it would cause a meld down, they get a heart attack when something dips below 60FPS. Sigh
        Last edited by markus40; 25 February 2021, 10:48 AM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by nranger View Post

          I think horizontal is preferred by Gnome designers because left/right swipes are common among tablet devices for home screen/app switching. And in that sense I get it. Scrolling content is already taken by up/down swipes, so requiring some context for a workspace switch is one overload they could eliminate.
          I don't understand: yhey're obsessed with this tablet oriented vision while there is absolutely no market or utility of gnome on tablets.
          I wish they focus on what actually people use Gnome for: Desktop PC.

          However I'm a horizontal multi-monitor desktop user and vertical workspaces make more sense to me. I already have multiple monitors and therefore apps arranged conceptually on the X axis. I'm using a mouse to navigate, so combined with the workspace indicator extension, I can use the scroll wheel with only a finger flick to change the "app content" of a vertical workspace on a particular monitor. On the desktop I have more monitor real estate, and my brain is usually in work mode, so arranging monitors + workspaces in a 2D grid is more powerful and efficient.
          so do I. I hope there will be a setting or extension to keep the vertical desktops.

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          • #35
            - Experimental support for more WebExtensions APIs, among other improvements to this GNOME web browser.
            This is excellent news! Epiphany is a very capable web browser and I'm happy we have a backup/alternative to the big names. I was very surprised to find that they have already implemented support for Firefox Sync. But this means we'll also have extensions like Bitwarden and uBlock Origin working in the future.
            I sometimes use it to browse documentation since it's lighter than both Chrome and Firefox.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by AnAccount View Post

              Yes, but what editor do you use?
              Nano :P

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              • #37
                Originally posted by birdie View Post
                To me the last good DE for Linux was KDE 3.5.10 and it's been all downhill since then. At the moment XFCE remains the only usable classic PC desktop for Linux.

                Both Gnome and KDE contain tons of gimmicky smart devices oriented crap. E.g. gnome has long parted ways with standard menus and now offers three dot menus which are unusable without the mouse/touch{screen|pad}. Most Gnome applications have a ton of white/wasted space.

                Lastly, a desktop PC DE must be usable without the mouse/touch{screen|pad}. Gnome =>3, KDE => 4 and Windows >= 8 are all complete failures in this regard. Can't say anything about MacOS - never used it.
                This is how you realize when you are getting old: 'the wold is evolving, please stop'.

                PS. Linux permits you to use the terminal that is perfectly usable without mouse/touchpad.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by markus40 View Post
                  I use Gnome since 1998, I used Red Hat 6.x (I believe), then Mandrake (7/8?), then Fedora, then seven years Gentoo which I copied from hard disk to hard disk, from new device to new device without reinstalling. Until there was a few months of pain with every emerge. Then Fedora for a moment. But after two releases I wanted a rolling release again. Now a happy Arch user for more than seven years already. I use Gnome on my laptops exclusively, But I use Openbox on my server which does many tasks, but the main one is media server and emulation machine hooked on my living room TV. I use Nautilus, ssh, rdesptop/Xrdpc to access my server on the fly. But also a lot command-line tools when it is more convenient. I automate everything that I do more than twice and is time/manual intensive. My daily job is dealing/supporting applications on Linux all around the world.

                  I like Gnome, I'm looking forward to the new Gnome-shell and think I can ditch most extensions with this new release. I like Wayland and it works okay for me. Furthermore, I like Pulseaudio, but also Pipewire, although it has still many rough edges for me to use it as daily driver. People who dislike Wayland have forgotten how X was on Linux around the time it stopped being XFree86. The people who have developed Wayland have given you the X server (Xorg) which you put on a pedestal.

                  I never could install OpenSuse, Debian or Ubuntu without some problem. I tried KDE and other desktops from time to time but never can get use to them and/or they have quirks like crashing or using a lot CPU. I use OSX on my work Macbook and dislike it with passion. I think Windows 10 get a lot of slack, a lot my applications I use on my work Windows machine I can build up when maximizing, or freeze for seconds. If Gnome did this it would cause a meld down, they get a heart attack when something dips below 60FPS. Sigh
                  I'm looking for some tester(s) of my new file browser, you seem like the right person, care trying it out and sharing what you like/don't like about it? [1] (cornus is the exe name you need to double-click after building).

                  It's easy to build, build instructions are included for Ubuntu on the github page. Linux 5.3+ and Qt 5.13+ required.

                  [1] https://github.com/f35f22fan/Cornus
                  Last edited by cl333r; 25 February 2021, 01:06 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by mppix View Post
                    This is how you realize when you are getting old: 'the wold is evolving, please stop'.

                    PS. Linux permits you to use the terminal that is perfectly usable without mouse/touchpad.
                    Not only getting old. The dot menu problem with gnome applications in fact makes it hard to configure for different disabled people users. Being able to keyboard only navigate with a restricted set of keys does have some important use cases.

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                    • #40
                      mv rm cp
                      You might want to be careful with running that command... 😋

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