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  • Solido
    replied
    Originally posted by pabloski View Post
    ... In one sentence: macOS makes users productive!
    I am using all systems currently depending on the task and I think you nailed the OSX approach.
    They really try to server users requirements while keeping the whole thing coherent ... as much as possible.
    The lambda user is the driver of the realisation.

    While on the linux desktop side the lambda user is an ****** that does not understand the philosophy and ask for useless features like dates and thumbnail instead of shaders.

    I really hope that GTK4 will address more productivity and help more lambda user stick with linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • 144Hz
    replied
    JackLilhammers I didn’t say you hate Red Hat. I said you projected hate. That’s very different.

    So Red Hat has an excellent track record of not doing evil. They could easily CLA all their work and force the remaining contributors into something similar as the Qt or Canonical CLA scams. Red Hat chose not to do that.

    Instead they allowed Independents, Canonical, Endlessm and others to gain maintenance rights on modules the depend on.

    That includes glib, control center, terminal and other modules.

    Leave a comment:


  • JackLilhammers
    replied
    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
    JackLilhammers Sorry but you and Mez’ need to stop projecting your hate on Red Hat.

    So you got trapped by the Qt CLA. Mez’ got trapped by Canonical CLA. Deal with your stuff and keep Red Hat out of it.
    I don't hate Red Hat. Why should I?
    Besides, don't you think that things can be a little more nuanced than love or hate?

    Leave a comment:


  • Citan
    replied
    Originally posted by White Wolf View Post
    What a great achievement. Windows is superior here, they did it more than 20 years ago...
    Hope linux in 10 years will be polished as Windows 10 now for end user then maybe it will be used more for desktops.
    I was at first gonna say "don't waste everybody's time by fishing with dynamite"...
    Then decided to read whole thread first.
    Seems I was wrong, you got more than half-a-dozen.

    Impressive catch, good for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • 144Hz
    replied
    JackLilhammers Sorry but you and Mez’ need to stop projecting your hate on Red Hat.

    So you got trapped by the Qt CLA. Mez’ got trapped by Canonical CLA. Deal with your stuff and keep Red Hat out of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    pabloski JackLilhammers

    You may be right after all. For example, I always hated top panel, but after switching to Gnome I kinda like it. It's sometimes matter of getting used to it. The same is true for Apple's design.

    Leave a comment:


  • JackLilhammers
    replied
    Originally posted by Volta View Post

    I had and their usability is far away from my preferences. I even prefer Windows over it, but Windows is terrible mess overall. I always preferred KDE over everything, but I'm currently Gnome user, because it's more polished.
    Personal preferences aside, I think that calling Apple UI/UX a joke is a little stretched.
    For better or worse, they're the one company obsessed with design.

    By the way macbooks are the only laptops where you feel you don't need a mouse.
    Neither Windows nor Linux even come close yet.

    Windows is messy, but that's the price for backwards compatibility, something that in the Linux world seems almost like an nuisance.
    When your os runs on the majority of the desktops in the world you can't just replace the old and familiar UI with a new one and expect the people to be fine with it.
    They tried with Windows 8 and we all saw what happened.

    Gnome did that too and that gave us at least Cinnamon and Budgie. (and Pantheon?)

    Leave a comment:


  • JackLilhammers
    replied
    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
    Mez' It doesn’t matter what you care about. Canonical only cared about Unity when it served as a purpose to inject CLAed project into linux desktops. As soon as the CLA injection failed they dropped Unity.

    So your lack of opinion on CLA doesn’t matter.
    You do realise that most of the world doesn't even know what's a CLA, right?

    Leave a comment:


  • JackLilhammers
    replied
    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
    Mez' So all your absurd claims about Red Hat really comes down to UnityVsShell? That’s the most sad thing I’ve seen on Phoronix ever.
    Nope. As Mez' said it comes down to the sheer numbers provided by the Gnome project itself.

    Red Hat contributes most of the code and most of the commits, in a word, most of the work.
    It's just consequential that they have most of the control.

    Don't you think that it would be risky to pour lots and lots of resources, like you said, in a project you don't control?
    You'd have to be quite naive to believe they don't.
    Last edited by JackLilhammers; 14 January 2021, 08:13 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • pabloski
    replied
    Originally posted by Volta View Post

    I had and their usability is far away from my preferences. I even prefer Windows over it, but Windows is terrible mess overall. I always preferred KDE over everything, but I'm currently Gnome user, because it's more polished.
    Preferences are subjective. But if the target of an UI is to let the user do his job with less mouse movements and keypresses, then Apple has hit the jackpot.

    I am forced to use Vim on every Windows and Linux machine, because it is awful to program while going around with the mouse, pressing keys that are far from the home row ( End, Insert, Delete, the cursor keys ). I can use a normal editor on Macs, because the trackpad and the well designed ( from an ergonomic point of view ) keyboard makes it a breeze to move around.

    Or you can delete a file just by moving the cursor with your thumbs on the trackpad, then hitting Fn+backspace.

    These are minor things but that adds up. This is what I mean by usability. The same usability that I can have on PCs too, by using Vim and vim-like programs and plugins ( Vimium for Chromium and Tridactyl for Firefox, for example ). But I cannot have it by default, by using the built-in interaction mechanisms in Windows/Linux/BSDs.

    Leave a comment:

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