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Zrythm Inches Closer To v1.0 As Open-Source Digital Audio Workstation

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  • #11
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post

    No, I am a GNOME user
    Well, that's your problem

    but Zhythm seems to have its own custom styled widgets for knobs. Most GTK applications are not styled and just follow the GNOME HIG as they should.
    Contrary to popular belief, GTK doesn't stand for GNOME Toolkit

    Seriously though, I don't necessarily think the GNOME HIG could fully work with Zrythm. I just think the HIG is a little too minimalist and conservative for all the information that a program like Zrythm is trying to display.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      Seriously though, I don't necessarily think the GNOME HIG could fully work with Zrythm. I just think the HIG is a little too minimalist and conservative for all the information that a program like Zrythm is trying to display.
      Not to mention designed by people who think they're more knowledgeable about UI design than they are. That's why they've always told you things that contravene the results of academic research, like putting the application-scoped "Preferences" option in a document-scoped menu like "Edit" if you have a menu bar, and putting your dialog's action buttons in the header bar instead of where the signature field would be if your dialog were a paper form. (A principle based on working in cooperation with how human psychology and reading interact. Put the action that must be performed last at the "end of the page" as one of a forest of "anti-papercuts" to minimize the chance that a tired, distracted user will make a mistake.)

      ...and that's just the HIG, not the design decisions for the default icon theme.

      (It reminds me of how all this Microsoft-originated flat design nonsense is especially prone [direct] to producing UIs that slow users down. TL;DR: It's mostly that flat design encourages designers to not do enough to provide high-quality hints about which UI elements can be interacted with and how they relate to the non-interactive portions of the content... a problem the print media it's inspired by doesn't have because print isn't interactive.)
      Last edited by ssokolow; 15 December 2020, 04:53 AM.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

        Not to mention designed by people who think they're more knowledgeable about UI design than they are. That's why they've always told you things that contravene the results of academic research, like putting the application-scoped "Preferences" option in a document-scoped menu like "Edit" if you have a menu bar, and putting your dialog's action buttons in the header bar instead of where the signature field would be if your dialog were a paper form. (A principle based on working in cooperation with how human psychology and reading interact. Put the action that must be performed last at the "end of the page" as one of a forest of "anti-papercuts" to minimize the chance that a tired, distracted user will make a mistake.)

        ...and that's just the HIG, not the design decisions for the default icon theme.

        (It reminds me of how all this Microsoft-originated flat design nonsense is especially prone [direct] to producing UIs that slow users down. TL;DR: It's mostly that flat design encourages designers to not do enough to provide high-quality hints about which UI elements can be interacted with and how they relate to the non-interactive portions of the content... a problem the print media it's inspired by doesn't have because print isn't interactive.)
        I fully concur...and there is a special place in hell for the individual who designed the default formatting in MS Word. It always irritates me when I have to spend sometimes hours creating templates in any program than have that template screwed up by updates or try to change wording because the program thinks that it can express it more "appropriately." Especially when it comes to non-academic technical writing.
        Last edited by f0rmat; 15 December 2020, 05:13 AM. Reason: For clarity
        GOD is REAL unless declared as an INTEGER.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by f0rmat View Post

          I fully concur...and there is a special place in hell for the individual who designed the default formatting in MS Word. It always irritates me when I have to spend sometimes hours creating templates in any program than have that template screwed up by updates or try to change wording because the program thinks that it can express it more "appropriately." Especially when it comes to non-academic technical writing.
          That's literally why I use LibreOffice these days. Back when I did stuff on Windows it seemed like every update of MS Works, some free crap that came with the PC, would change something in a way that messed with us. Switch from Home Use to my Digital Desktop Design and Drafting class at the Tech College and all of our templates and projects on MS Publisher were all messed up after an update. It's infuriating. That was 15-20 years ago and all the MS stuff having issues is what fully nudged me into going full time with Linux.

          Today in 2020 I use the same basic contract I made around 2006 in OOO on LibreOffice. Updates haven't broke it. I just open it up, go to town, and save with a new name.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

            That's literally why I use LibreOffice these days. Back when I did stuff on Windows it seemed like every update of MS Works, some free crap that came with the PC, would change something in a way that messed with us. Switch from Home Use to my Digital Desktop Design and Drafting class at the Tech College and all of our templates and projects on MS Publisher were all messed up after an update. It's infuriating. That was 15-20 years ago and all the MS stuff having issues is what fully nudged me into going full time with Linux.

            Today in 2020 I use the same basic contract I made around 2006 in OOO on LibreOffice. Updates haven't broke it. I just open it up, go to town, and save with a new name.
            I wish that I could...unfortunately I work for a corporation that is Windows and Office based. MS Office is about the only thing that keeps me from being 100% Linux.
            GOD is REAL unless declared as an INTEGER.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by f0rmat View Post

              I wish that I could...unfortunately I work for a corporation that is Windows and Office based. MS Office is about the only thing that keeps me from being 100% Linux.
              I lucked out in that Windows was such a dumpster fire around 1999-2005 that it made me actively find something different and that something different worked and has worked since. Since the only work related things I need a PC for are drafting contracts, email, and purchases, Linux works just fine and covers all my needs.

              Heck, the only reason I have a 10 install is because my PC happens to have a 7 key on the case that worked with 10 Pro and it's nice to compare Windows and Linux performance with my games from time to time.

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