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Scheiße! KDE Plasma 5.21 To Add Palette For Easier Input Of Accented Characters

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  • #31
    Originally posted by kcrudup View Post
    Isn't Michael too?
    No, he's American. But according to an interview with Fedora Magazine, he does enjoy German beers, in particular Bavarian.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by kcrudup View Post
      Isn't Michael too?
      Sadly, no. Just really enjoy Germany, or in particular Bavaria.... Bavaria/Munich is/was my utopia.
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #33
        Hey, someone showed off this feature to me on OSX two weeks ago, and I thought it was quite handy, glad KDE isn't left behind.

        So, does that mean there is a generic user input method protocol, or is it completely managed by the toolkit?

        Originally posted by George99 View Post
        In the good old days when Sun was still shining their keyboards had a compose key in order to create such letters. I'm still using this key but now mapped to the right "Windows" Key (right super key). So ß can be composed with RWin-s-s and Motörhead with Rwin-o-"...
        Well, I am typing this on a Sun Type 7 keyboard I found lying around two years ago, and which I use as my primary keyboard.

        There is indeed a compose key, but it triggers the (in my opinion useless) context menu pop-up. Do you happen to have any idea about this? There are some DIP switches, but documentation is hard to come by...

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        • #34
          Originally posted by reba View Post
          I also think the example word is quite misplaced and I wondered what's going on here with using that kind of words.

          If you need something else, why not Me⃛täldötṥ or something that is not so offensive?
          Offend this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEDLc-7OoMw

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          • #35
            Originally posted by soulsource View Post
            What actually happened to the compose key? Is it still well-supported on KDE?
            There's an option under advanced settings for the keyboard, you can set a key as compose key over there. But I dn't know if the option is there/works under wayland yet.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by soulsource View Post
              What actually happened to the compose key? Is it still well-supported on KDE?
              Add another mark on the "Those who don't understand $thing are bound to reimplement $thing, poorly" sheet.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by rawr View Post

                Looks like diacritics to me. The characters might have their own code points, but that still would be mostly characters with diacritics, no?

                I agree that it's not only about characters with diacritics, but more about modifiable characters in sensible groups. Can we come up with a name for these not "normal" characters?
                Sure, visually speaking about the glyphs, ąęćłńóśżź are technically characters with diacritics, in the Polish language. But the thing they form, are not "accented characters". It would have been equally possible to have separate characters for this letters, that don't reassemble latin aeclnosz characters. Only ńśź are really close to their "main" character in sounds, and sometimes people make a mistake and write them as ni, si, zi, because ń and ni actually sounds on its own the same, i.e. koniec, and końec (second one a nonsensial world), actually sound the same. But, Środa, vs Siroda, sounds different. Zimno, Źmno also sound different (it is almost impossible to even pronounce the second one fluidly). There are no actual words starting with Ń, but even if I would want, to form one like, Ńsza, Nisza, they would sound different in pronouncation. These differences are not due to "accents", just them being different phonemes. Even English wikipedia gets this wrong, stating that Ńń are Nn with accute accent, which is untrue, even graphically, the "kreska" above Ńń (or in other ones, like ó), is different than the ´ diacritic, as used in other languages. I.e. ó and ó, are actually different. Unfortunately Unicode code it wrong, and they will look the same on your computer. In traditional Polish typography, they look different tho. (Here for some examples http://www.twardoch.com/download/pol...to/kreska.html , but http://www.twardoch.com/download/pol...to/ogonek.html is also a good read )

                Anyway. Off topic.
                Last edited by baryluk; 06 December 2020, 12:22 AM.

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                • #38
                  It's a feature I'm missing when coming from a phone keyboard. That's amazing they thought of adapting it for computer keyboards.

                  I hope Gnome will follow, without the need for yet another extension.

                  It's convenient for:
                  - Ç in French although not too complicated to hit (currently shift + ç) compared to Windows (alt + 0199)
                  - í, ó, etc... in spanish
                  - and the eszett in german, as I'm using Scheiße quite a bit myself (I can barely speak german though)

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                  • #39
                    Holy moly! What a bunch of sissies* being offended by "Scheiße".

                    It's a very good example on the contrary, as you can do it on a phone keyboard with a long press on the s (I have to switch to german keyboard first though).

                    The ä, ö, ü, ë, ï, ê, î, é, à, è, ù and such are very easy to hit on azerty keyboards. Probably Hungarian, Polish, Czech, Swedish, etc... have their own easy ways to type the many accented characters in their language.
                    On qwerty, not so much since the English language doesn't have many.
                    Hitting accented characters through long presses would make it much much easier on qwerty keyboards and even if common in some leyboard layouts, it's still great if you can avoid changing your hand position to reach the combining keys.



                    * back off SJWs

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by baryluk View Post

                      Sure, visually speaking about the glyphs, ąęćłńóśżź are technically characters with diacritics, in the Polish language. But the thing they form, are not "accented characters". It would have been equally possible to have separate characters for this letters, that don't reassemble latin aeclnosz characters. Only ńśź are really close to their "main" character in sounds, and sometimes people make a mistake and write them as ni, si, zi, because ń and ni actually sounds on its own the same, i.e. koniec, and końec (second one a nonsensial world), actually sound the same. But, Środa, vs Siroda, sounds different. Zimno, Źmno also sound different (it is almost impossible to even pronounce the second one fluidly). There are no actual words starting with Ń, but even if I would want, to form one like, Ńsza, Nisza, they would sound different in pronouncation. These differences are not due to "accents", just them being different phonemes. Even English wikipedia gets this wrong, stating that Ńń are Nn with accute accent, which is untrue, even graphically, the "kreska" above Ńń (or in other ones, like ó), is different than the ´ diacritic, as used in other languages. I.e. ó and ó, are actually different. Unfortunately Unicode code it wrong, and they will look the same on your computer. In traditional Polish typography, they look different tho. (Here for some examples http://www.twardoch.com/download/pol...to/kreska.html , but http://www.twardoch.com/download/pol...to/ogonek.html is also a good read )

                      Anyway. Off topic.
                      I think people here should stop focusing on "accented" characters.
                      I think Michael used it as a broader term, since this keyboard idea stemming from phones is actually used for any alternative character to a base one (the ß is a double s, ç is for c, ź is for z, etc...).

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