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Manjaro 20.2 Brings Arch-Based Linux 5.9 Experience, GNOME Version Defaults To Wayland

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  • creative
    replied
    Originally posted by stiiixy View Post
    I'm in the same boat. I always felt online gaming was naturally geared towards co-operative play, but it was swamped with competetive behaviour, even within the team you were assigned. 'My dicks is bigguh! attitude got old before I did πŸ˜ƒ
    Hahah, for sure, same here.

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  • stiiixy
    replied
    I'm in the same boat. I always felt online gaming was naturally geared towards co-operative play, but it was swamped with competetive behaviour, even within the team you were assigned. 'My dicks is bigguh! attitude got old before I did πŸ˜ƒ

    Leave a comment:


  • creative
    replied
    Originally posted by polarathene View Post

    I've used Manjaro since 2016, ran into several issues. Two notable ones that come to mind was 4.9 LTS kernel and XFS filesystem, was previously on 4.8 kernel, and some regression/bug was introduced, whenever waking from suspend or midnight logrotate was scheduled to run caused a kernel panic. It may have had something to do with the default (on manjaro) BFQ at the time too. Took months before that was resolved (I did contribute to kernel bug report along with others).

    2nd one was I updated too early (which is a bit ironic with Manjaro) and some KDE lib was packaged badly, kauth or something. Prevented booting into the DE and package manager was having troubles working properly as it relied on that IIRC, had to read up on pacman and do something there I think. If I had waited a day or two later I'd not have been hit by that.

    Regarding game compatibility, I hear it's mainly an issue with online competitive ones that have anticheat bundled. I don't play those, so had no issues with games beyond needing to lookup some launch flag to add in steam for certain titles, but that's rare. Windows proprietary software on the other hand (when no suitable open-source alternative available), usually less great. Sometimes software is functional mostly, but fails at some stuff or just UI rendering issues (oddly one was with a Qt based interface).
    I'm a bit behind responding.

    I have not known a distribution to not have annoying issues at some point. I just deal with it. Like right now background shader pre-caching for The Witcher 3 will stall X, have to ctrl+alt+F# then ctrl+alt+F7 back and its freed upβ€”it fully saturates my 32GB of RAM and that's what hangs the X server. Other people are having the same issues with pre-caching on certain titles.

    The day of "games never stutter" is nowhere near in sight for consoles all the way up to PC's with the fastest hardware. Its just a fact of gaming life.

    My opinion on the matter is, if its a computer you are bound to have stuff funky now and then, perpetually! It is what it is.

    I am actually amazed at all the games I am able to run and play with acceptable to almost flawless performance.

    Don't play any online games I grew out of that in my mid twenties. I just got tired of competing, I felt it was pointless.

    Now.... I game for soulful reasons, of course that sounds loaded but oh well. Video games can really vivify my outlook and view on life. That is why I really love gaming as a hobby. There are a lot of gems out there.
    Last edited by creative; 10 December 2020, 02:03 PM.

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    I think I'm going to give 5.9 a miss from now on, and hope that nVidia get CUDA sorted for 5.10.

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  • stiiixy
    replied
    Yeah, 5.9 was real funky for me a month ago as well. Tried with same result during RC as well. I'm running simple AMD 3200G on classy mini-itx Asus and Gigabyte motherboards and keen to see how some more updates work since I last tried.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Well, I updated. Shiny new kernel time!

    CUDA is still broken on 5.9. Some curious errors in my work applications (closed source, sadly) which appear to imply issues with things other than CUDA (like bitching about "unknown version" in libtiff) but no... the problem is CUDA. Go back to 5.8, everything works fine.

    Back to 5.8 I go... again...

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by polarathene View Post

    While I want that BTRFS setup, there's still extras OpenSUSE adds with default install that I've got to figure out. Beyond snapper, there's routine maintenance systemd units related to it IIRC, and while I believe we can get a modified GRUB for the snapper integration, I'd like similar with systemd-boot, not sure if that's available, been a while since I last looked. I'm not sure if all those extras are documented, or if you just have to become aware of them (at which point it gets easier to reproduce on another distro).

    I don't mind doing all that extra work, and I kinda like learning them for a better understanding, it's just not always clear (unless Arch Wiki covers it), or there's multiple choices (ZRAM/ZSWAP I think had several similar options beyond direct configuration). Then there's stuff becoming out of date, infinality font package I think no longer has relevance?
    If you search hard enough, SUSE has their BTRFS partition and Snapper setup documented and from there it's just combining what they do with the Arch Wiki. I was thinking about replicating SUSE's BTRFS setup on Arch back around January, but thinking is as far as I got before I got the distro hop bug. Now that I've got the hop bug out of my system I'm gonna get around to making the most hardcore ZFS on Root setup I can imagine because why not?

    I'm not sure of an Arch/systemd method either aside from this snippet in the Arch Wiki. ZFS and systemd-boot is in the same boat. I feel like not many people are bothering with systemd-boot since GRUB and /boot are still used in so many places. IMHO, systemd-boot should have considered adopting something like Clover so they could emulate a UEFI and be used on more systems.

    I don't think infinality fonts are needed anymore, but there is infinality-remix which is going strong. I'd be nice if they'd provide before and after screenshots. I say that but I'm posing from a 55" 4K TV. Font aliasing isn't an issue on my setup.

    Oh? When did that happen? Last I knew Arch didn't play well with AppArmour or SELinux and I don't think Manjaro bothered with either as a result, but this was back in 2016. I've not noticed any issues, although I've only heard of SELinux getting in the way rather than AppArmour.
    Not sure. Just happened to notice the AppArmour kernel command lines in Manjaro's mkinitcpio.conf day before yesterday.

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  • polarathene
    replied
    Originally posted by Mez' View Post
    I see a lot of complaints about Manjaro package freeze and AUR leading to brocken packages. I'm not sure I understand what it is all about. I'm crossing my finger this won't happen to me. It hasn't yet although I'm using both pacman and yay (for AUR access).
    The more you rely on AUR packages, the higher the chance of that happening. But in my experience it happens maybe once every year on average? Often only if there's something falling out of sync with dependencies on the core repo packages vs Manjaro's equivalent.

    One in particular that I remember was an update to OpenSSL caused problems. Arch held back the update until that issue was resolved months later, while Manjaro with their bad reputation in the past about security practices opted to push forward with the latest release. So AUR packages depended on the older version which had ABI breakage, preventing compatibility. This affected plenty of packages that would want to access the internet I think.

    Another was earlier than that, Xorg was being held back an entire version due to driver support for some older AMD cards not being ready. Some AUR packages depended on the newer Xorg package, so that wouldn't work either.

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  • polarathene
    replied
    Originally posted by creative View Post
    Could something go seriously wacky eventually? Yes it could, I have yet to see it though. Been using Linux since 2001 and this is the only distribution that feels like it could withstand a nuclear blast compared to everything else I have used.
    I've used Manjaro since 2016, ran into several issues. Two notable ones that come to mind was 4.9 LTS kernel and XFS filesystem, was previously on 4.8 kernel, and some regression/bug was introduced, whenever waking from suspend or midnight logrotate was scheduled to run caused a kernel panic. It may have had something to do with the default (on manjaro) BFQ at the time too. Took months before that was resolved (I did contribute to kernel bug report along with others).

    2nd one was I updated too early (which is a bit ironic with Manjaro) and some KDE lib was packaged badly, kauth or something. Prevented booting into the DE and package manager was having troubles working properly as it relied on that IIRC, had to read up on pacman and do something there I think. If I had waited a day or two later I'd not have been hit by that.

    Regarding game compatibility, I hear it's mainly an issue with online competitive ones that have anticheat bundled. I don't play those, so had no issues with games beyond needing to lookup some launch flag to add in steam for certain titles, but that's rare. Windows proprietary software on the other hand (when no suitable open-source alternative available), usually less great. Sometimes software is functional mostly, but fails at some stuff or just UI rendering issues (oddly one was with a Qt based interface).

    Leave a comment:


  • polarathene
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    Like I said above, the best part about vanilla Arch is being able to setup the file systems to do things like replicate OpenSUSE's BTRFS setup.
    While I want that BTRFS setup, there's still extras OpenSUSE adds with default install that I've got to figure out. Beyond snapper, there's routine maintenance systemd units related to it IIRC, and while I believe we can get a modified GRUB for the snapper integration, I'd like similar with systemd-boot, not sure if that's available, been a while since I last looked. I'm not sure if all those extras are documented, or if you just have to become aware of them (at which point it gets easier to reproduce on another distro).

    I don't mind doing all that extra work, and I kinda like learning them for a better understanding, it's just not always clear (unless Arch Wiki covers it), or there's multiple choices (ZRAM/ZSWAP I think had several similar options beyond direct configuration). Then there's stuff becoming out of date, infinality font package I think no longer has relevance?

    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    FWIW, Manjaro uses AppArmour and Arch and be configured to use either.
    Oh? When did that happen? Last I knew Arch didn't play well with AppArmour or SELinux and I don't think Manjaro bothered with either as a result, but this was back in 2016. I've not noticed any issues, although I've only heard of SELinux getting in the way rather than AppArmour.

    Leave a comment:

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