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Linux App Summit 2020 Videos Now Available From Steam/Valve To GNOME Circle

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  • Linux App Summit 2020 Videos Now Available From Steam/Valve To GNOME Circle

    Phoronix: Linux App Summit 2020 Videos Now Available From Steam/Valve To GNOME Circle

    The 2020 Linux App Summit just concluded as a conference focused on the Linux user-space/applications. Given the pandemic, it was a virtual conference and the video recordings are now available...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...pp-Summit-2020

  • #2
    I'm super excited for PipeWire. Finally we'll be able to get something comparable to Mac's CoreAudio.

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    • #3
      does pipewire require pulseaudio?
      does it work only with alsa?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by loganj View Post
        does pipewire require pulseaudio?
        does it work only with alsa?
        Unfortunately PipeWire requires pulseuadio and can only be used with OSS not ALSA /s.

        But in all seriousness, PipeWire is intended to be a full replacement for Pulseaudio and JACK not requiring either, but can still provide support for applications that use ALSA, Pulseaudio or JACK. Similar to how Pulseaudio can create a fake ALSA sink.

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        • #5
          Sounds pretty fake. There isn't any framework, virtual machine, interpreter that's strictly specific to Linux. The concept of "linux apps" doesn't exist. Java is pretty much the only relevant thing that produces applets for the Linux platform, and Java is certainly not tied to Linux whatsoever. Most Linux programs are native. Stuff running on Mono counts as a Windows app, as .NET existed before Mono and .NET applets are surely Windows specific. Linux apps don't exist, stop using this term. They're native programs.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lyamc View Post
            I'm super excited for PipeWire. Finally we'll be able to get something comparable to Mac's CoreAudio.
            My GPU is connected via HDMI 2.0 to an AV receiver (4K60 passthrough capable), the sound goes to a 5.1 setup and possibly Atmos in the near future, while the video goes to a 65" 4K60 TV.
            Pulseaudio has been working flawlessly for me for at least 7-8 years in a similar setup audio-wise (previously with a SD TV).

            What is Piprewire supposed to bring me as a user concretely that Pulseaudio can't then? I don't understand yet how users will benefit from it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mez' View Post
              My GPU is connected via HDMI 2.0 to an AV receiver (4K60 passthrough capable), the sound goes to a 5.1 setup and possibly Atmos in the near future, while the video goes to a 65" 4K60 TV.
              Pulseaudio has been working flawlessly for me for at least 7-8 years in a similar setup audio-wise (previously with a SD TV).

              What is Piprewire supposed to bring me as a user concretely that Pulseaudio can't then? I don't understand yet how users will benefit from it.
              Its much more than that, If pulse works for you perfect, pipewire works for you to (or at least it will). Pipewire is pretty much a all in one solution. It to my understanding, is working to merge many audio/video use cases. for instance as I said above is one such example. another thing. There is a good chance that many people wont see a change in their day to day life,

              some potential usecases would be Complex car audio/video. think a tesla with laptop and mobile audio, getting audio to work seemlessly with their "channel" system they talked about in the video. Not only that but pipewire would also be able to handle the video, front cameras, rear cameras, lane detect cameras, dash cameras, driver facing cameras etc. in therory you could easily add remove any audio/video device to a car running pipewire.

              as for in the home. most people probably, as I said before won't notice much, though I could see whole home surveillance and a whole home audio and AI being integrated using pipewire. but it pretty much merges all of the benefits jack has, (advanced audio routing, low latency etc.) with all the benefits of pulseaudio, in a way that should be completely out of the end users way, without being locked down at all. Personally i know, game streamers and recorders that do live mixing on a linux PC will be helped out tremendously.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eydee View Post
                Sounds pretty fake. There isn't any framework, virtual machine, interpreter that's strictly specific to Linux. The concept of "linux apps" doesn't exist. Java is pretty much the only relevant thing that produces applets for the Linux platform, and Java is certainly not tied to Linux whatsoever. Most Linux programs are native. Stuff running on Mono counts as a Windows app, as .NET existed before Mono and .NET applets are surely Windows specific. Linux apps don't exist, stop using this term. They're native programs.
                Does flatpak or snap qualify?
                My flatpak apps work great

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                  Its much more than that, If pulse works for you perfect, pipewire works for you to (or at least it will). Pipewire is pretty much a all in one solution. It to my understanding, is working to merge many audio/video use cases. for instance as I said above is one such example. another thing. There is a good chance that many people wont see a change in their day to day life,

                  some potential usecases would be Complex car audio/video. think a tesla with laptop and mobile audio, getting audio to work seemlessly with their "channel" system they talked about in the video. Not only that but pipewire would also be able to handle the video, front cameras, rear cameras, lane detect cameras, dash cameras, driver facing cameras etc. in therory you could easily add remove any audio/video device to a car running pipewire.

                  as for in the home. most people probably, as I said before won't notice much, though I could see whole home surveillance and a whole home audio and AI being integrated using pipewire. but it pretty much merges all of the benefits jack has, (advanced audio routing, low latency etc.) with all the benefits of pulseaudio, in a way that should be completely out of the end users way, without being locked down at all. Personally i know, game streamers and recorders that do live mixing on a linux PC will be helped out tremendously.
                  Is there any hope for IEEE AVB/TSN support? Car audio/video as well as professional audio will will adopt that rather sooner than later and the current Linux support is less than stellar.

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