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GNOME Power-Profiles-Daemon Taking Shape For Better System/Laptop Power Controls

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  • GNOME Power-Profiles-Daemon Taking Shape For Better System/Laptop Power Controls

    Phoronix: GNOME Power-Profiles-Daemon Taking Shape For Better System/Laptop Power Controls

    The GNOME Power Profiles Daemon (power-profiles-daemon) has begun taking shape over the past few weeks for ultimately allowing better controls over system power preferences with different profiles...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...rofiles-daemon

  • #2
    Hopefully this will give us hassle free more battery life. I tried Fedora on my macbook air when I bought it in 2013, and found the battery life is disastrous (~4 hrs idle, 2-3 hrs when coding).
    I knew there were ways to get the 10-hr battery life back through a bunch of tweaks, but it's a quite tedious process....

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    • #3
      Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
      Hopefully this will give us hassle free more battery life. I tried Fedora on my macbook air when I bought it in 2013, and found the battery life is disastrous (~4 hrs idle, 2-3 hrs when coding).
      I knew there were ways to get the 10-hr battery life back through a bunch of tweaks, but it's a quite tedious process....
      Linux in 2013 wasn't particularly good in terms of battery life. The fact that you tried it on that horrible designed hardware without proper drivers as apple commits nothing at all didn't help the battery time either.

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      • #4
        Why not intergrate with tuned?

        - dbus
        - profiles
        - maintained by Red Hat
        - can generate hardware specific profiles using powertop

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Britoid View Post
          Why not intergrate with tuned?

          - dbus
          - profiles
          - maintained by Red Hat
          - can generate hardware specific profiles using powertop
          From the README:
          Originally posted by README.txt on gitlab.freedesktop.org
          Why not...

          tuned and TLP

          Both projects have similar goals, allowing for tweaks to be applied, for a variety of workloads that goes far beyond the workloads and use cases that power-profiles-daemon targets.
          A fair number of the tweaks that could apply to devices running GNOME or another free desktop are either potentially destructive (eg. some of the SATA power-saving mode resulting in corrupted data), or working well enough to be put into place by default (eg. audio codec power-saving), even if some quirks might be needed on some hardware.
          Both are good projects to use if the intent is to experiment with particular settings to see if they'd be something that can be implemented by default, or to put some fine-grained policies in place on server-type workloads which are not as fluid and changing as desktop workloads can be.
          https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/hades...rofiles-daemon

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          • #6
            How is this going to differ from something like https://store.kde.org/p/1282623/, i.e. will it integrate Intel P-state and CPUFreq for intel based systems?

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            • #7
              This is pretty cool, it could also show remaining battery on Bluetooth headsets.

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              • #8
                Anything that makes Linux power management less finicky is welcome IMHO.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post

                  Linux in 2013 wasn't particularly good in terms of battery life. The fact that you tried it on that horrible designed hardware without proper drivers as apple commits nothing at all didn't help the battery time either.
                  Yeah, it all depends on the hardware. On my current ThinkPad, battery life isn't great on Linux but manageable. Could be better, could be worse. However, on my previous laptop, a Dell Chromebook 13, battery life was excellent with about 10 hours of heavy use and 11-12 hours of non-heavy use. And I'm talking full-blown Linux here, not ChromeOS (I replaced the latter with Linux by flashing the full SeaBIOS).

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                  • #10
                    is it really necessary for everything to have such long-winded names?

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