Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GNOME Shell's Icon Grid Could See Almost Double The Performance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Originally posted by Danielsan View Post
    The grid is so useless that it would be better removing it completely...
    What about allow the user to select between a grid and a normal menu?

    This way we target both desktop and tablet users.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
      Vistaus GNOME got many thousands of issues. Less than half is even reported or verified. Why would anyone question that?
      Yeah, but this is the first time you admitted so by yourself, without anyone telling you.
      When you talk about the other desktop, you say they're so flawed.

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

        What about allow the user to select between a grid and a normal menu?

        This way we target both desktop and tablet users.
        I know you tried to be constructive, but:
        1. How many tablets with preinstalled GNOME are available to justify the grid?
        2. How many tablets were available ten years ago to justify the grid?
        3. How many tablets are available to install a distribution with GNOME considering that even on desktop is hard to get GNOME working because it requires a proper opengl GPU driver.
        4. When did having a menu stop to be useful on a tablet UI? The Kindle Fire UI does have a hierarchy that resembles a menu.

        Based on the GNOME3 attitude the grid should be ditched since the moment there aren't enough users or devices that requires it, or at least this has been the justification they have been using when started to remove functionalities from the GNOME 3 Desktop Environment.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Britoid View Post

          Animations in GNOME Shell are being handled in C.
          if they can't make their C code fast, i don't even want to see what horrors we get with their JS stuff

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by Danielsan View Post

            I know you tried to be constructive, but:[*]How many tablets with preinstalled GNOME are available to justify the grid?
            None, pretty much :< (but at least we're preparing for a possible future)

            Originally posted by Danielsan View Post
            [*]How many tablets were available ten years ago to justify the grid?
            Lots, if you mean non-GNOME ones.

            Originally posted by Danielsan View Post
            [*]How many tablets are available to install a distribution with GNOME considering that even on desktop is hard to get GNOME working because it requires a proper opengl GPU driver.
            Aww none :<

            Originally posted by Danielsan View Post
            [*]When did having a menu stop to be useful on a tablet UI? The Kindle Fire UI does have a hierarchy that resembles a menu.
            I didn't say they are a bad idea.

            Comment


            • #66
              tildearrow There’s nothing to admit. Software Issues are just a fact of life. You don’t get to admit facts, you can either accept them or choose to be an idiot-in-denial.

              Of course GNOME’s issues largely remain actionable because they got a reasonable sized team working on it. KDE? Just look at the recent KDEPIM meltdown, that’s a problem that can only be solved with rm. rm code, rm toxic people.

              Comment


              • #67
                Danielsan My hybrid laptop identity as a tablet.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
                  Danielsan My hybrid laptop identity as a tablet.
                  He said "preinstalled".

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    tildearrow LoL, the paid openSUSE guys do a much more extensive testing on GNOME. That’s a request from SUSE who ships GNOME in their SUSE desktop version.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                      Gnome 3 wont even start on an old computer because of the over reliance on GPU features (i.e needs a relatively recent version of OpenGL support by the GPU)

                      So the option for old machines is LLVMPipe (entirely software rendered). And that is not fast on old processors (which an old machine likely has).

                      If you have an old PC (or a server GPU like a matrox); use Gnome 2.

                      That said, focusing on optimization is a good start. Perhaps if they can aim for something like the ability built into the Windows desktop to turn off GPU reliant features (https://www.windowscentral.com/sites...-windows10.jpg) they would be also slightly further along the way to a desktop that works well in enterprise and remote computing.

                      Wayland would also need some fairly major improvements to work without a number of GPU features. However this would also make it more feasible for a number of use cases where it has failed (such as SoC, ARM, Raspberry PI, etc).
                      While it's true that not requiring OpenGL 3+ for an "ordinary desktop" experience might be completely necessary, for example by disabling enough animations/effects that LLVMPipe can run with acceptable performance, I was thinking more of a 10 year old laptop, which will in fact have OpenGL 3+.
                      Gnome 3 only mentions "hardware acceleration", so I'm not certain that actually requires OpenGL 3, 2.0/2.1 might be enough.

                      OpenGL 3 was released on August 11, 2008, and 2.0 was released on September 7, 2004. If I were to run a desktop on anything older than that, I'd probably use i3, Awesome or Fluxbox.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X