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GNOME Shell's Icon Grid Could See Almost Double The Performance

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  • GNOME Shell's Icon Grid Could See Almost Double The Performance

    Phoronix: GNOME Shell's Icon Grid Could See Almost Double The Performance

    On top of an optimization to lower render times and reduce power usage and fixing window culling as another performance optimization, Canonical's Daniel van Vugt also came across another serious optimization for GNOME Shell's icon grid performance...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...id-Double-Perf

  • #2
    GNOME 3.38 is going to be very fast. Who would have thought 10 years ago. They really created something special over time.

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    • #3
      I'm grateful somebody is focusing on rendering performance in Gnome, it should be fast and responsive even on an old computer.

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      • #4
        if I knew that gnome 3.38 were going to be that fast I wouldn't have bought a new PC last month

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        • #5
          I wouldn't consider it fully "fixed" before it can deliver 60fps animations without frame drops and cursor stutter for 100% of the time. Maybe not in 4k with crappy Intel Gen9 graphics, but 1440p should be possible.

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          • #6
            The notification area also has performance issues when there are too many notifications

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Azpegath View Post
              it should be fast and responsive even on an old computer.
              Gnome 3 wont even start on an old computer because of the over reliance on GPU features (i.e needs a relatively recent version of OpenGL support by the GPU)

              So the option for old machines is LLVMPipe (entirely software rendered). And that is not fast on old processors (which an old machine likely has).

              If you have an old PC (or a server GPU like a matrox); use Gnome 2.

              That said, focusing on optimization is a good start. Perhaps if they can aim for something like the ability built into the Windows desktop to turn off GPU reliant features (https://www.windowscentral.com/sites...-windows10.jpg) they would be also slightly further along the way to a desktop that works well in enterprise and remote computing.

              Wayland would also need some fairly major improvements to work without a number of GPU features. However this would also make it more feasible for a number of use cases where it has failed (such as SoC, ARM, Raspberry PI, etc).
              Last edited by kpedersen; 29 June 2020, 07:57 AM.

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              • #8
                Computer Specs:

                AMD A8-7600 APU
                16GB DDR3 RAM
                Radeon RX 5600 XT
                1TB hard drive
                Distro: Arch Linux
                DE: GNOME 3.36

                In my desktop, I opened the overview, clicked in the grid in the lower left corner of the screen, and it took me about 1 second to load a grid of applications, which is something that I don't use at all. Maybe there are far too many applications in my system (mostly musician-related) that causes GNOME Shell to take a second or two to load up a grid of applications.

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                • #9
                  I just wish they replaced the animation with a bottom-up one like on Android and iOS instead of the one that folds diagonally from bottom-left to top-right.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                    Gnome 3 wont even start on an old computer because of the over reliance on GPU features (i.e needs a relatively recent version of OpenGL support by the GPU)
                    "relatively recent" as in "less than 15 years old"

                    Wayland would also need some fairly major improvements to work without a number of GPU features.
                    Yeah, because supporting 15+ year old hardware that can be easily replaced makes a lot of sense.
                    #NOTABUG
                    #WONTFIX
                    #CLOSED

                    However this would also make it more feasible for a number of use cases where it has failed (such as SoC, ARM, Raspberry PI, etc).
                    You mean Wayland should work around the fact that the drivers on these devices suck ass? How about fixing the actual issue and writing better drivers (or some at all)?

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