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Another Intel 4K + GNOME Optimization Yields 5% Faster Render Times, 10% Lower Power Use

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  • Another Intel 4K + GNOME Optimization Yields 5% Faster Render Times, 10% Lower Power Use

    Phoronix: Another Intel 4K + GNOME Optimization Yields 5% Faster Render Times, 10% Lower Power Use

    Daniel van Vugt of Canonical who has been responsible for many GNOME performance optimizations in recent years has another tantalizing improvement under review...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Avoid-Multiply

  • #2
    BUT WAIT, there's more!

    https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gnome..._requests/1329

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    • #3
      Awesome job! Now this big one just need to land then more stuff like variable frame rates can go in as well.
      https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/mutte..._requests/1285

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      • #4
        Next week he'll discover every 3rd window is being painted 100 times.
        Last edited by down1; 06-26-2020, 09:07 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by down1 View Post
          Next week he'll discover every 3rd window is being painted 100 times.
          That's sarcasm for sure, but I do wonder how GNOME developers managed to make everything so slow and inefficient and why it took so long to find out. Maybe it's a good idea to browse through the shaders generated for mutter and look for more.

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          • #6
            brent Most devs prefer to avoid premature optimizations. Stuff gets fixed when profiling proves it to be significant. So the new thing is that profiling now targets higher pixel count systems like 4k screens and 2x 4k screens.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
              brent Most devs prefer to avoid premature optimizations. Stuff gets fixed when profiling proves it to be significant. So the new thing is that profiling now targets higher pixel count systems like 4k screens and 2x 4k screens.
              This doesn't apply to situations where window cullng is supposed to be implemented but is not in fact running.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by brent View Post

                That's sarcasm for sure, but I do wonder how GNOME developers managed to make everything so slow and inefficient and why it took so long to find out. Maybe it's a good idea to browse through the shaders generated for mutter and look for more.
                If it's like a lot of other GNU/Linux projects, many of the devs are using MacOS for their own machines instead of eating their own cooking. One big reason I prefer MX is the devs actually use it and talk to you about it in the forums every day.

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                • #9
                  down1 In fact it does. In this case the total pixel count pretty much saturated the HW. If you ask why it wasn’t catched earlier then the likely answer is that the regression got papered over by other significant improvements and didn’t show on 2k screens. The CI need to do a variety of performance tests to catch cases like this. Remember Mutter got a large dev team and many commits so everybody can’t keep eyes on every moving part.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
                    brent Most devs prefer to avoid premature optimizations. Stuff gets fixed when profiling proves it to be significant. So the new thing is that profiling now targets higher pixel count systems like 4k screens and 2x 4k screens.
                    "Premature", sure, LOL. GNOME 3.0 was released around 10 years ago. As far as I can tell, there simply was no serious profiling and analysis being done until some ~3 years ago - and performance issues were mostly ignored or downplayed by developers. This culture of ignorance w.r.t performance hurt GNOME a lot. I'm glad we're beyond that, though.

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