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NetworkManager 1.24 Coming Soon With VRF Support, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

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  • NetworkManager 1.24 Coming Soon With VRF Support, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

    Phoronix: NetworkManager 1.24 Coming Soon With VRF Support, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

    Friday marked the release of NetworkManager 1.24-RC1 as the first test candidate for this component important to wired and wireless networking on the Linux desktop...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...nager-1.24-RC1

  • #2
    This NetworkManager OWE support is contingent upon WPA-Supplicant being built with the capability enabled
    So not usable with IWD?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by polarathene View Post

      So not usable with IWD?
      It seems it does not, I'm not an expert in the source of NM but this file is the only one where there is a list of encryption modes for IWD. https://github.com/NetworkManager/Ne...m-wifi-utils.h

      Still, IWD does support OWE, so it's just a matter of wiring that up.

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      • #4
        Hm, it seems strange to design a new cryptography protocol based on DH, since that is not quantum safe. Sure, quantum computers of a size able to break this is certainly at least a few years away. However, installed access points can have a long life time, especially in homes. Some of my neighbors' networks show up as 802.11b still!

        My understanding (though I'm far from an expert) is that WPA2-PSK should be safe against Shor's algorithm at least, since it is based on a shared secret (as opposed to private/public keys). Obviously that will not hold for WPA2 Enterprise (at least with some of the possible configurations of it). (And yes, I'm aware of that WPA2 has other weaknesses, as was shown with for example KRACK.)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Vorpal View Post
          Hm, it seems strange to design a new cryptography protocol based on DH, since that is not quantum safe. Sure, quantum computers of a size able to break this is certainly at least a few years away. However, installed access points can have a long life time, especially in homes. Some of my neighbors' networks show up as 802.11b still!

          My understanding (though I'm far from an expert) is that WPA2-PSK should be safe against Shor's algorithm at least, since it is based on a shared secret (as opposed to private/public keys). Obviously that will not hold for WPA2 Enterprise (at least with some of the possible configurations of it). (And yes, I'm aware of that WPA2 has other weaknesses, as was shown with for example KRACK.)
          OWE does sound much better than plaintext...

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