Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GNOME Shell + Mutter See Big Last Minute Improvements With The GNOME 3.36 Beta

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Teggs View Post
    These arguments often include that holding down a key and pressing three others, or opening a search bar and entering characters, is faster than moving a mouse and double-clicking on a screen object: an argument that was false, is false, and will remain false in future.

    I wonder what is really driving this push to kill desktop icons.
    I don't believe that you're able to show the desktop and double-click an icon in 0.2-0.5 seconds, which is the time a moderately slow keyboard user spends tapping four or five keys. Maybe a few professional gamers are faster with the mouse than most users are with a keyboard, but it's very difficult to believe. But obviously, modern systems should learn what you want and provide fast access to that, rather than requiring you to maintain a map manually.

    The desktop icons was removed from the default file manager because nobody wanted to maintain it and it was in the way of other things, but also because the desktop should belong to the desktop shell rather than a file manager or web browser.

    Comment


    • #32
      ...Rhythmbox to GNOME Music...
      Gnome Music fails to import my music collection which is ~320GB, mostly .flac. It just locks up in the face of that amount of files.

      CMUS can import that many in speedy fashion. Though I have issues with the UI in CMUS.

      I really haven't found a music player I like for Linux, I just have to use MediaMonkey on Windows. I've seriously considered coding my own.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by brent View Post
        I really hope they land a lot more stuff! The most important area of GNOME, performance, still didn't get the attention it deserves. And this time it's not just Daniel's MRs that have been stalled. E.g. fullscreen unredirection on Wayland has been quite ready for months, but doesn't get any attention from maintainers. Many of the performance-oriented MRs would only require a little bit of additional work, if any. It's a bit sad.

        The gnome-with-patches copr shows the potential of the current set of performance patches: with the patches, GNOME runs at solid 60 fps at all times, for the first time. Doesn't matter if you have 100 windows in the overview or if a heavy build runs in the background, it's still nearly flawless.
        Is this it? I'm tempted to give it a try.
        https://copr.fedorainfracloud.org/co...-with-patches/

        Comment


        • #34
          I look forward to GNOME 3.36!
          I hope it includes improvements to GNOME Builder (such as newer Python + GTK templates, with better Meson, Flatpak and Snap support).
          I would also like to see improvements to gitg (a GTK client for Git) which seems very promising.
          Something I miss in gedit is support for multiple cursors.

          I used to like Rhythmbox but it seems like it is not getting any development and it starts to fall behind, so maybe it is good to throw it out and throw in GNOME Music instead. Unless Rhythmbox were to get an upswing in development.

          I would also like to see Glade (the GTK user interface builder) get some love to output better XML. Though I find the GtkBuilder XML a bit tricky to work with when hand-editing XML files, I wonder if it got any better with GTK 4.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

            Actually, this paradigm is one of GNOME's selling points and strengths. Hitting super and pressing 2-3 keys to find any app you want and open it afterwards with a single click is far more efficient than any old style menu/submenu hierarchy. Any often used app can be pinned on a bar and for the rest you just need to vaguely remember its name or its function.

            The main issue with GNOME is that it is not efficient if you need to work with many windows and switch focus often between them. It needs a proper autohidden taskbar in my opinion.
            I can achieve the same thing and a lot more using krunner. I can map krunner to meta and it shits all over gnome.

            Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

            LOL, talking about "strawmans" while strawmaning himself. Dude, he was NOT speaking about double-clicking desktop icons. His rant began with Windows 8/10, which SURPRISE have the same double clicking desktop icons since the earliest versions of windows, nothing changed in that regard.... And it is obvious from his rant that his main issue is the start menu or lack there of.

            By the way, desktop icons are garbage. There is no reason to have them at all, i don't use them on Windows, i don't use them on KDE, so i am not missing them on GNOME. They are just a clutch for lazy people.
            You are a moron. Gnome might suffice for your watching anime, but desktop icons are very useful for people who use their computers for productivity, especially if you need to access a lot of folders. Gnome is a DE designed by utter morons, it's not a surprise that majority of Gnome Devs use Mac OS as their main computer as they don't want to go near this stinking pile of shit

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by kaprikawn View Post
              Gnome Music fails to import my music collection which is ~320GB, mostly .flac. It just locks up in the face of that amount of files.

              CMUS can import that many in speedy fashion. Though I have issues with the UI in CMUS.

              I really haven't found a music player I like for Linux, I just have to use MediaMonkey on Windows. I've seriously considered coding my own.
              Some people run foobar2000 under Wine.
              There is also DeaDBeeF which is for Linux but inspired by foobar2000. I don't know if those maybe work better for you.
              Then there is Rhythmbox and Amarok.

              If you were to roll your own maybe you could use SQLite as database backend, but you would need RocksDB, LevelDB or LMDB, I don't know which one is the more suitable one backend to store the metadata.

              Then for the UI you might not be able to present all data at the same time, and might have to limit how many songs you present, because UI widgets might not be good at handling such a large amount of entries, example if you use a GTK then maybe you would use a GtkTreeView widget, but I think if you have thousands of entries, it is not so good.

              There is also Music Player Daemon (MPD) which is a backend and there are many clients for it, and if you like none of them you could write your own client for it.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                Windows 8 and Windows 10 introduced what I call "The Age of Convolution."

                This is the time when simple and direct point and click interfaces, where GUI efficiency was easily measured by the average number of scrolls and clicks it took to access any program, was replaced by who-knows-what, and the subsequent requirement that users type in hoped for commands in a search box like good old DOS, or look it up on the Internet, to find out where it is.

                And sadly Gnome was one of the the first in Linux to follow this confused paradigm, though Unity was the first, in, what I consider, to be Linux abominations to GUIs.

                But I don't know. Maybe I'm just old, and getting to programs simply and quickly doesn't matter anymore. And I'm not being facetious. From what I've seen many people just place shortcuts somewhere, and if they don't have a plethora of them it works okay.

                But, again, I don't know. Between Windows 10 and most Linux desktops today, it seems that while the Age of Convolution predominates, it is worse, not better.
                unity was a great DE. The best ever made in linux world, I miss a lot how fast I can produce with it, the old fasion DE are old for old people and old pc usage (one app for session)

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Teggs View Post

                  Nice strawman. Muncrief wasn't speaking about using the menu system, he was speaking about double-clicking a desktop icon.

                  I have never seen anyone argue that the ability to search for a program by typing its name was bad or should be removed. I repeatedly see people saying that desktop icons are bad and should be removed. These arguments often include that holding down a key and pressing three others, or opening a search bar and entering characters, is faster than moving a mouse and double-clicking on a screen object: an argument that was false, is false, and will remain false in future.

                  I wonder what is really driving this push to kill desktop icons.
                  The desktop icons add a layer to the background of the desktop enronvinment. The Gtk3 libs are slow, and that layer slow them down further. Wayland make thing worse.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by frank007 View Post

                    The desktop icons add a layer to the background of the desktop enronvinment. The Gtk3 libs are slow, and that layer slow them down further. Wayland make thing worse.
                    How bloated and idiotically coded must Gnome be if desktop icons significantly impact performance. What more evidence do you need that gnome is a dumpster fire and the best way forward is to throw gnome in the fire and start from scratch?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by 240Hz View Post

                      How bloated and idiotically coded must Gnome be if desktop icons significantly impact performance. What more evidence do you need that gnome is a dumpster fire and the best way forward is to throw gnome in the fire and start from scratch?
                      Cool, are you offering to program a new desktop?

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X