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Firefox 72 Released With Picture-In-Picture Video Support Working On Linux

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  • rmoog
    replied
    I'm sorry, but since when is Firefox a TV interface? This is not in scope for a web browser.

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  • holunder
    replied
    I’ve been using PiP now for several months via manually enabled flag and the now official state is a step backwards for me: Every video that goes PiP shrinks to a fraction of its size, it even gets scrollbars?! I can resize it but it shrinks again if I double-click it to maximize and double-click again to make it small. I’m using Firefox on a 4K monitor with HiDPI set to 163 dpi via Plasma’s font size. But even if you would consider the mini size a HiDPI-agnostic value, it makes no sense since it just is extremely tiny.
    Last edited by holunder; 01-07-2020, 09:14 AM.

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  • treba
    replied
    I'd like to take the chance to point out that the number of developers working actively on Firefox Linux support is quite small, like for so many other important projects. So if you have some practical skills on that field and care for the Linux desktop, feel invited to help. It's fun

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by fguerraz View Post

    The problem is potentially dmabuf, which is actively being worked on. But so far what is implement yields no performance improvement, it is slated only for wayland, but at least for Chrome it seems to improve CPU usage substantially during video playback, especially on HiDPI.
    dmabuf helps when you don't want to be copying pixels around.

    If you're decoding a video, you can pass a memory buffer to the decoder that represents the subsurface and have it render there which avoids copying, which eats away at CPU.

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  • vein
    replied
    Originally posted by brainlet_pederson
    Firefox is a completely dead browser. Their market share is in the single digits now. It just goes to show -- you can't just hire dozens of blue-haired SJWs into software engineering roles and hope they'll produce quality work. Especially not when you're competing with Google.
    Except that Firefox market share is actually increasing and is expected to be in double digits again shortly...

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  • fguerraz
    replied
    Originally posted by hax0r View Post
    Lower WebRender CPU usage please, my Thinkpad T430S turns into space heater when using youtube even though I use hardware decoding and force H264 playback with h264ify.
    The problem is potentially dmabuf, which is actively being worked on. But so far what is implement yields no performance improvement, it is slated only for wayland, but at least for Chrome it seems to improve CPU usage substantially during video playback, especially on HiDPI.

    Leave a comment:


  • chocolate
    replied
    For GNOME Shell users, Window Corner Preview or Miniview extensions already provide this functionality for any window of your choosing, regardless of worskpace, and are therefore more versatile.
    You can detach a tab from Firefox, make it fullscreen, move it to a dedicated workspace, then have one of those extensions pick it up and provide the same PiP experience.

    https://extensions.gnome.org/extensi...orner-preview/
    https://extensions.gnome.org/extension/1459/miniview/

    Leave a comment:


  • sverris
    replied
    Originally posted by 240Hz View Post

    Use MPV to play youtube videos, for example using an extension that allows you to open a webpage in another program.
    There is also something funny at hand: when I use YT in FF, a certain video uses a certain percentage of my machine's computing power. When I run the same video f.i. in FF with the ViewTube add-on, there is way less computing power needed. And when I open the same video in VLC (f.i. with help of the 'Open in VLC media player add-on'), it needs even less resources - probably 1/4 of what is needed with normal use of YT.

    (Edit: seems like VLC plays f.i. 720p with 30 frames, while YT plays it with 60 frames. Yet on older machines, the use of VLC makes really sense...)
    Last edited by sverris; 01-07-2020, 06:08 AM.

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  • 240Hz
    replied
    Originally posted by vladimir86 View Post
    I did use Firefox from 2006 till 2019, except a couple of years with SeaMonkey. Stopped with ver 68-69 because videos would constantly freeze while on fullscreen. Actually I had that problem years ago, but back them it was blamed on Flash... now I have no idea.

    Version 72 has the same issue. No matter if I used my Integrated Intel drivers or discrete AMD. Plus I always ad that annoying issue with videos playing at 480p and having to select 1080 manually on Youtube. I am not fan of Chromium, but I got really tired of waiting for a fix or trying to sort for this bug.
    Use MPV to play youtube videos, for example using an extension that allows you to open a webpage in another program.

    Leave a comment:


  • 240Hz
    replied
    Originally posted by sandy8925 View Post

    I see that you're brainless pedersen, an idiot troll who hasn't achieved shit in their life, and can only talk down to others.
    He is right though. Firefox is going downhill, and they dont even care about linux despite Linux users disproportionately using Firefox more than on other platforms, and purple haired trannies is a part of it and a legitimate concern.

    Leave a comment:

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