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Trinity Desktop R14.0.7 Released For Keeping KDE 3 Spirit Alive In 2020

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    starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    Enlighten me how you can put these items in the task bar in KDE5:
    Write a plasmoid (widget thing) that does that? How do you think current indicators were created? It's not like you can't do it, there are already plasmoids that do something similar.

    Also, tell me how the task bar can be made fully transparent. I have neither time, nor desire to constantly minimize all my apps to stare at the desktop where I have pretty much nothing. It's asinine.
    what does this even mean. What use has a trasparent task bar at all.
    You mean auto-hiding task bar it is in the task bar own options. Rightclick on the task bar, select "Edit Panel" and then "more settings" on the additional bar that pops up, then you can select auto-hide or "windows can go above" (I guess this is similar to the "invisible"?) and "windows can go below" option for your task bar.

    Also, enlighten me how to stop KDE from shitting all over my ~/.config and ~/.local
    Disable "show hidden files" in your file manager. It's not like any other applications are much better and you are not supposed to edit config files manually for a GUI anyway, KDE isn't GNOME.

    Leave a comment:

  • Paradigm Shifter
    Senior Member

  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by k1e0x View Post
    And I can go on.. Explorer is the only file manager that does not highlight a selection on right click. And it still does this today. Try for yourself. Click on blank space in explorer to un-select a file. Then right click the file. Every other file manager will select the file and give you the context menu for the file. Explorer does not, it give you the context for the folder.. and that is very confusing. as... you just clicked on the file?? If you want the context menu for the file you have to left click it.. then right click it again. Jes.. what a great OS.. the pinnacle of UI design..
    And in list view with total files exceeding the fill of the window, these oh-so-helpful auto-select-file methods do not allow me access to the folder context menu. I have to switch to icon view, carefully navigate my cursor into the space between two or more file icons/names and right click then.

    Explicit selection of target before context action is a good thing, not a bad thing.

    ...

    The search-in-start-menu function was introduced in Vista, which everyone seems to want to forget. Not without reason, although honestly it gets a lot of stick because Microsoft wanted to move to a more secure driver model, rather than the classic "allow any driver access to all the things" that it had followed before (apologies for the oversimplification) and every hardware manufacturer took that as an opportunity to stop supporting a ton of stuff and just blamed it on Microsoft. Well, that and the minimum spec shot up due to the desktop becoming "3D accelerated" with Aero. The Windows 7 start menu was nearly perfect for my use case when I used it, but the Vista one was close.

    The only function Microsoft seems to stubbornly avoid adding to Windows File Explorer is tabs.

    Leave a comment:

  • Sonadow
    Senior Member

  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Also, enlighten me how to stop KDE from shitting all over my ~/.config and ~/.local

    KDE3/4 stored everything under ~/.kde{3,4} and /var/tmp/$username. XFCE stores everything under ~/.config/xfce4 and doesn't really have any temporary files to speak of.

    Only KDE5 doesn't respect any conventions.
    Got to agree on this. Personal pet peeve when using Plasma 5. It stopped being a problem when I decided to stop caring about tidying up or maintaining the hidden folders in $HOME.

    Generally, when it comes to desktops, I keep three installed: Weston, Plasma 5 and Gnome 3. Weston for daily usage, Plasma 5 for when I need to do things very quickly with a mix of Wayland and X applications, and Gnome 3 as a fallback when things go apeshit on Weston or Plasma 5. Because Gnome 3 is really the only desktop GUI on Linux that has practically complete Wayland functionality.

    Leave a comment:

  • ehansin
    Senior Member

  • ehansin
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    Also, enlighten me how to stop KDE from shitting all over my ~/.config and ~/.local

    KDE3/4 stored everything under ~/.kde{3,4} and /var/tmp/$username. XFCE stores everything under ~/.config/xfce4 and doesn't really have any temporary files to speak of.

    Only KDE5 doesn't respect any conventions.
    I stay out of these desktop wars, but yeah, I posted something similar here before. Seemed ridiculous to be spreading config files all over the root of ~/.config vs. creating sub-directories to "namespace" these some, and keep things clean. I saw that and said I'm done.

    Leave a comment:

  • k1e0x
    Senior Member

  • k1e0x
    replied
    Originally posted by JPFSanders View Post

    I completely agree with you, I would add that GUI development peaked back in the Windows 2000 era and has been since getting progressively worse ever since. As you mentioned Windows 8 was the abomination.
    Originally posted by betam4x View Post

    I don't know, that Windows 7 start menu is BOSS. I've yet to find a superior application launcher to it.
    You realize on the old versions of windows you can't search in the start bar.. right? Applications were grouped by Program > Manufacture Name > Application. So in some cases that was clear but in other cases it was very hard to find because you didn't know the company who created the software.

    If you are looking for a good Application Launcher try Spotlight. (Gnome's is similar)


    And I can go on.. Explorer is the only file manager that does not highlight a selection on right click. And it still does this today. Try for yourself. Click on blank space in explorer to un-select a file. Then right click the file. Every other file manager will select the file and give you the context menu for the file. Explorer does not, it give you the context for the folder.. and that is very confusing. as... you just clicked on the file?? If you want the context menu for the file you have to left click it.. then right click it again. Jes.. what a great OS.. the pinnacle of UI design..
    k1e0x
    Senior Member
    Last edited by k1e0x; 30 December 2019, 08:23 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • slalomsk8er
    Senior Member

  • slalomsk8er
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Enlighten me how you can put these items in the task bar in KDE5:
    • CPU usage indicator
    • Various HW sensors as numbers
    • RAM use as numbers
    • Network interfaces activity LEDs
    • Tasks run at an internal output
    • Weather conditions and current temperature as a number
    etc. etc. etc.

    Also, tell me how the task bar can be made fully transparent. I have neither time, nor desire to constantly minimize all my apps to stare at the desktop where I have pretty much nothing. It's asinine.
    Half of the stuff you ask for can be had with one Widget "Command Output". I use it to keep track of how bad my connection is: ping -c 4 8.8.8.8 | tail -1 | awk '{print $4}' | cut -d '/' -f 2 | xargs printf "%8.2fms"

    The rest needs to be developed if not already existing - at least your widget will not break on the next minor update like in Gnome.

    I think I don't get, what you want to accomplish with a transparent task bar but I guess the task bar gets the transparency from the theme.
    Originally posted by k1e0x View Post

    Idk.. the entire concept is bad.. always was.. personally I'm a gnome/mac user.. I press a key and see all my open apps. no lists at all. Far simpler and I don't have to move my hands at all.. What is easier to click... a 10x40 square at the edge of the screen, or a 80x80 picture in the center?
    I never got the need for this expose stuff - Plasma has it in the top left corner. I didn't bother to find the or bind a hotkey for this as I use it as much as I use the file indexers to help me find content in my files. I also try to avoid GPS for navigating but that is just me: I like to know where stuff is and hold it in a mental map.

    If I have a complex task going, that needs multiple windows, I use virtual desktops for fast random access.
    slalomsk8er
    Senior Member
    Last edited by slalomsk8er; 07 February 2020, 06:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • betam4x
    Senior Member

  • betam4x
    replied
    Originally posted by JPFSanders View Post

    I completely agree with you, I would add that GUI development peaked back in the Windows 2000 era and has been since getting progressively worse ever since. As you mentioned Windows 8 was the abomination.
    I don't know, that Windows 7 start menu is BOSS. I've yet to find a superior application launcher to it.

    Leave a comment:

  • k1e0x
    Senior Member

  • k1e0x
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Fine mouse movements are difficult for toddlers and people with Parkinson's. If you have troubles using your mouse, maybe computer UIs are not for you and you'll be better served by the tablet.
    Yeah right.. this is denial right here. I didn't say they are "hard" I said they are expensive, meaning they take time away from *any* user not just disabled ones. Your preferred interface uses a lot of fine movements, I'm sorry that just isn't optimal but that's the case. I think you need to take a step back and re-evaluate things.. perhaps the reason you like what you like is due to familiarity more than ease of use. That is ok.. but it is a different thing.

    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    Windows 95 was a culmination of UI development backed by strong scientific UI/HIG research. It all went out of the window when Windows 8 arrived which then was maimed even further by iOS/Android and then resulted in the abomination of UIs that we have now, including brain-damaged Web 3.0.
    Yes, but most of that old research has been thrown out for better models and subsequent research. As we learn new information we have to abandon old ideas. I agree with you on Web 3.0 tho..

    Any UI design will show the most valuable areas of the screen are the edges, because they are the easiest to hit. Windows 95 uses none of them well. The very easiest is the top, then the sides then the bottom.
    k1e0x
    Senior Member
    Last edited by k1e0x; 30 December 2019, 07:26 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • JPFSanders
    Senior Member

  • JPFSanders
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Fine mouse movements are difficult for toddlers and people with Parkinson's. If you have troubles using your mouse, maybe computer UIs are not for you and you'll be better served by the tablet.

    Windows 95 was a culmination of UI development backed by strong scientific UI/HIG research. It all went out of the window when Windows 8 arrived which then was maimed even further by iOS/Android and then resulted in the abomination of UIs that we have now, including brain-damaged Web 3.0.

    Strangely most people with an actual brain agree with me.
    I completely agree with you, I would add that GUI development peaked back in the Windows 2000 era and has been since getting progressively worse ever since. As you mentioned Windows 8 was the abomination.

    Leave a comment:

  • ALRBP
    Senior Member

  • ALRBP
    replied
    I use KDE since KDE3 and I do not see how KDE5 can be considered inferior to KDE3. If the only things you are missing are old widgets/applications, port them, instead of maintaining a whole DE.

    Unlike GNOME (and Windows), KDE kept a good desktop design. There are none of those stupid pseudo-modern things you see in GNOME3, Windows 10 or, worse of all, Windows 8 ! This "convergence" thing is stupid. Why would you want tablets and computers to have the same interface ? Cars and motorcycles do not have the same "interface", because they are different things with different characteristics, even though they have similar purposes : moving.
    This stupid idea destroyed GNOME and Windows but NOT KDE (nor LXQt). Cinnamon exists for the good reason that GNOME3 adopted bad design principles (they happily seem to have realized that fact and are now providing classical sessions themselves) but KDE5 is great and I see no reason to prefer KD3/Trinity. Cinnamon and KDE(5) do the things right : a good, classical, design over modern technologies (GTK3/Qt5).

    Now, if people want to lose time maintaining an outdated KDE, well, that's their right.

    Leave a comment:

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