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Google Chrome To Begin Marking Sites That Are Slow / Fast

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  • Dieter
    replied
    > Google can already topple nations at the tip of a hat. See: Public Television's _Frontline_ episode 3805 In the Age of AI (2 hours) An anti-social website I will call frakbook experimented on the public to influence US elections. (very rough paraphrase, their exact wording forgotten) Why are hoodyboy and friends not in prison? > slow Internet connection Google would of course suggest getting Google Fiber. I suspect that the 3 or 4 households in Kansas City that actually managed to get GF before G decided that digging trenches was too much like work and canceled expanding the system actually have fast and reliable connection, at the cost of G seeing every single packet that goes in or out of your system, instead of merely almost everything. [ I assume that this website will mangle the formatting of this posting. It did not used to mangle text. Something on the website is broken and I cannot fix it. Sorry. ]

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  • WalterCool
    replied
    Looks like the big brother to me. It would give too much power at Chrome about internet.

    Personally dislike.

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    "Further along, we may expand this to include identifying when a page is likely to be slow for a user based on their device and network conditions."
    That can be pre-computed pretty easily as well.
    If a website requires the user to login, Google cannot by definition perform their own analysis of the website. If they did such an analysis, it would mean that they are leaking the username and password from Google Chrome's list of saved passwords.
    I'm not sure Google ever said they want to use this to scan sites their GoogleBots would not be allowed access to, I have some doubts about how much this would be legal at all.

    Because afaik many places and forums that are otherwise login-only still allow GoogleBot in to scan and index the site (of course with read-only access) https://support.google.com/webmaster...r/182072?hl=en

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  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    From the blog post, this seems to just show the result of their own analysis of the website, something similar to Google Safe Browsing.
    I believe it is possible you might be wrong:
    • Citation from the blog post: "Further along, we may expand this to include identifying when a page is likely to be slow for a user based on their device and network conditions."
    • If a website requires the user to login, Google cannot by definition perform their own analysis of the website. If they did such an analysis, it would mean that they are leaking the username and password from Google Chrome's list of saved passwords.

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    I am wondering whether it is possible that, for example, on a relatively slow computer/phone and slow Internet connection Chrome will mark 90% of sites as slow,
    From the blog post, this seems to just show the result of their own analysis of the website, something similar to Google Safe Browsing.

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  • Teggs
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    If users from Europe are viewing North America websites, or vice versa, which incurs extra latency due to the speed of light, would Google Chrome notify the website owner to establish a new server in Europe (or vice versa in North America) closer to a sizeable subset of its users?
    'Host on Google to receive a faster rating!'

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  • atomsymbol
    replied
    I am wondering whether it is possible that, for example, on a relatively slow computer/phone and slow Internet connection Chrome will mark 90% of sites as slow, while on a relatively fast computer/phone and fast Internet connection it will mark 30% of sites as slow. Would it in the former case display the advice "Buy a faster machine/phone" to the user? If so, would it also take the yearly income and country of the user into account?

    If users from Europe are viewing North America websites, or vice versa, which incurs extra latency due to the speed of light, would Google Chrome notify the website owner to establish a new server in Europe (or vice versa in North America) closer to a sizeable subset of its users?

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
    The point is that this is an obvious thing they can abuse if they wish so.
    I repeat my point. There has never been any control over what Google indexes in their databases most people use to access information in the Internet.

    They have already full control of the system and we don't know how much they are influencing, they don't need a thinly disguised stick like that on top.

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  • DoMiNeLa10
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    My (X)doubt was about him noticing a 0.2 second delay, or the browser telling him that.
    Considering that you can make websites that load in less than a second, or where scripts are initialized asynchronously, it's very easy to see a 150ms delay. Even 20ms would be VERY noticeable when scrolling around on average device.

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  • DoMiNeLa10
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

    That's peanuts if compared to what they already accomplish by tailoring the search result to each individual. Doing Google searches from PCs of two different people show very different results (and world views) on many topics.

    Google can already topple nations at the tip of a hat.
    The point is that this is an obvious thing they can abuse if they wish so. Anyone who is aware of how bad this company is will see through this thing right away. If the average person was smarter than their doorknobs, this would be very bad press for them.

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