Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Google Chrome To Begin Marking Sites That Are Slow / Fast

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • JanW
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Maybe. I guess it's possible to have local databases for most of that. Like all websites in your language or of your nationality.

    TL;dr All your data belongs to Google if you use Chrome with default settings.
    Thank you, that is a useful reminder!

    About a local database for all websites in my language(s), I'm doubtful. I've been using internet since the Mosaic days. Back in the time, there were internet directories that tried to exhaustively catalogue all web sites in existence. The fraction of sites listed was not so bad initially, but obviously this quickly fell apart completely. I have no idea of the numbers today, but my intuition would be that such a database would tend to fill my disks and even trying to keep it synchronized might use up a large portion of my shabby "broadband" internet connection.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by JanW View Post
    Now if they want to show speed info or other ratings for a significant fraction of all sites, that database will need to remain on Google's servers, I guess, and lookup could not be performed locally.
    Maybe. I guess it's possible to have local databases for most of that. Like all websites in your language or of your nationality.

    The point is that Chrome by default does send over to Google more or less anything you do:
    https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/9116376?hl=en
    • Autocomplete searches and URLs: If Google is your default search engine, Chrome may send the text you type in the address bar to Google to get suggested search terms. These suggestions are based on related web searches, your browsing history and popular websites.
    • Show suggestions for similar pages when a page can't be found: When you can't connect to a webpage, you can get suggestions for other pages like the one you're trying to reach. Chrome sends Google the web address of the page you're trying to reach to offer you suggestions.
    • Help improve Safe Browsing: Chrome will periodically send some system information and page content to Google so we know about any threats you encounter.
    • Make searches and browsing better: Help us improve Chrome and your browsing experience by allowing Google to anonymously collect data about the sites you visit. Chrome usage statistics includes information about the web pages you visit and your usage of them if "Make searches and browsing better" is turned on.
    • Enhanced spell check: Use the same spell-checking technology in Chrome as Google Search. Chrome sends the text you typed to Google.


    TL;dr All your data belongs to Google if you use Chrome with default settings.
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 11-12-2019, 08:36 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by JPFSanders View Post
    If this "your website is slow" was a feature you could run from one of the web developer menus it wouldn't be so bad, however if they tell your customers around the world that your website is slow by displaying it on the URL for example, they are making you and your company look bad, period, they're ruining your reputation... for free.
    That's a great incentive to not make a slow site.

    If there is anything most people don't understand is "speed", it has to be one of the most ambiguous and subjective things ever to measure on a computer system, Ironically this entire website is built around this premise.
    Not really. Speed is relative but once you define a frame of reference it is perfectly quantifiable.

    Leave a comment:


  • khnazile
    replied
    I got it: resources hosted on local network and accessible at 1Gbps, but over boring old HTTP/1.1 will be marked as "slow". And fancy new stuff using QUIC will be marked as "fast" even if you have 2Mbps uplink and 300+ ms latency.

    Leave a comment:


  • JanW
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    It seems this is a list-based system so Firefox is just downloading lists of bad sites from Google's repos, but the system is local, it does not send all your URLs over https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb...rotection-work
    Reassuring. So Firefox only sends data about your browsing to Google if you either hit a site listed as dangerous (to double-check it has not been whitelisted recently), or if you want to protect downloaded executable files. I guess this works, because you can actually cover quite some ground with a database of malicious URLs of a size that can be reasonably download in the background.

    Now if they want to show speed info or other ratings for a significant fraction of all sites, that database will need to remain on Google's servers, I guess, and lookup could not be performed locally.

    Leave a comment:


  • paupav
    replied
    gmail is probably the slowest website on the internet, I wonder if they will mark it as slow?

    Leave a comment:


  • kpedersen
    replied
    What about sites that are slow by design? i.e sites running from my home / consumer internet connection are not exactly going to be fast, and yet great for sharing software with colleagues.

    This superficial gatekeeping from Google is fine, but it is not really "the internet".

    Leave a comment:


  • JPFSanders
    replied
    Here we go again...

    Google has reached plateau, just like MS did in the mid 2000's and they are starting to add anti-features because they do not know what to add next, don't know how to leave good enough alone, and are trying to anticipate your future needs. Usually "predicting" which is only a great idea on some guys head down in the bowels of the product and marketing department and makes corporations even more arrogant after their latest great idea is met with resistance or disdain.

    If this "your website is slow" was a feature you could run from one of the web developer menus it wouldn't be so bad, however if they tell your customers around the world that your website is slow by displaying it on the URL for example, they are making you and your company look bad, period, they're ruining your reputation... for free.

    If there is anything most people don't understand is "speed", it has to be one of the most ambiguous and subjective things ever to measure on a computer system, Ironically this entire website is built around this premise.
    Last edited by JPFSanders; 11-12-2019, 07:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
    I was talking about them using the fast page program to drive people away from sites with content they don't like regardless of how fast they are.
    That's peanuts if compared to what they already accomplish by tailoring the search result to each individual. Doing Google searches from PCs of two different people show very different results (and world views) on many topics.

    Google can already topple nations at the tip of a hat.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
    Google Analytics can easily block the main js thread for ~150ms, which is a lot when you actually make a website that's fast.
    My (X)doubt was about him noticing a 0.2 second delay, or the browser telling him that.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X