Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Firefox 70 Released With JavaScript Baseline Interpreter, Other Updates

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • fuzz
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny3 View Post

    Yeah right,
    I would've probably believed this if they werent nagging me so much with the sync feature, but they got insane with the ads for it, it too much and untrustworthy.
    And for the removal of the turn off updates option what can you say?
    How is that better for me having a backdoor always open so they can put tomorrow whatever crap they can think of.
    For me now Firefox = Windows 10.
    You do realize you can look at the source code, right? You don't have to trust Mozilla.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny3
    replied
    Originally posted by Lennie View Post

    The sync feature is not a problem, Firefox sync uses your password/passprhase to generate key and encrypts it on your machine/device before uploading. Mozilla has no access to your data. Theya couple of years ago actually spend a lot of time (maybe over a year) on making this protocol/system. Mozilla didn't want to get any government coming to them asking for any data, they don't want any access to it. It's similar to e2e messaging (although these days that could get the government on your neck too *sad face*).
    Yeah right,
    I would've probably believed this if they werent nagging me so much with the sync feature, but they got insane with the ads for it, it too much and untrustworthy.
    And for the removal of the turn off updates option what can you say?
    How is that better for me having a backdoor always open so they can put tomorrow whatever crap they can think of.
    For me now Firefox = Windows 10.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grogan
    replied
    Originally posted by cybertraveler View Post
    Shame about the build documentation. Some people are more the 'hack it together until it works' type. I expect they've had a fair few code commits from those types and thus they haven't sufficiently updated the documentation as the code has been improved.
    To be fair, they expect you to use a build bootstrapping script (maybe that's current) but you can't run things like that on Slackware, they are for the big distros like *buntu and Fedora etc. It was git sources too. I had all the main system dependencies the manual build doc specified so I thought I was good to go, but kept getting stopped for missing project libraries that had to be built in the env, a bindings generator there was no mention of that had to be checked out, built and needed PATH, as well as some html related perl modules. It also didn't like my installed utf8proc which there was also no mention of in the first place.

    Stuff like that. No biggy, I wasn't that angry about it and at least the build failures were informative enough.

    It's actually not a bad browser, certainly more useful than some of those other minimalist browsers I've tried. It's got enough functionality to log in, post, upload attachments etc. in a vbulletin forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • cybertraveler
    replied
    Originally posted by Grogan View Post

    Thanks for that, I got netsurf and set it to open local html files in my X File Explorer file manager. I've been testing it on files in /usr/doc and it seems to be the ticket. Firefox is overkill for reading docs.

    Silly build process though, with outdated build documentation, requirements that didn't exist when the docs were written, Perl modules, binaries, PATHs and new library checkouts that aren't mentioned anywhere and so on. After I finally got through it, I just manually installed it to /usr/local/bin, share and symlinked netsurf-gtk to netsurf to make it easier to remember. It's a 4.6 Mb binary after stripping... not bad.

    P.S. That was on Slackware, it was a wee bit easier on my Manjaro... pacman -Syu netsurf :-)
    Wow, nice to see you're using it. It was an Acorn user that first told me about that browser. Netsurf supports quite a few obscure / hobbyist platforms.

    Shame about the build documentation. Some people are more the 'hack it together until it works' type. I expect they've had a fair few code commits from those types and thus they haven't sufficiently updated the documentation as the code has been improved.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grogan
    replied
    Originally posted by cybertraveler View Post

    You might like to checkout this: https://www.netsurf-browser.org/

    It has some similarities with Dillo, but it's actively developed & maintained.
    Thanks for that, I got netsurf and set it to open local html files in my X File Explorer file manager. I've been testing it on files in /usr/doc and it seems to be the ticket. Firefox is overkill for reading docs.

    Silly build process though, with outdated build documentation, requirements that didn't exist when the docs were written, Perl modules, binaries, PATHs and new library checkouts that aren't mentioned anywhere and so on. After I finally got through it, I just manually installed it to /usr/local/bin, share and symlinked netsurf-gtk to netsurf to make it easier to remember. It's a 4.6 Mb binary after stripping... not bad.

    P.S. That was on Slackware, it was a wee bit easier on my Manjaro... pacman -Syu netsurf :-)
    Last edited by Grogan; 23 October 2019, 06:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lennie
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
    Too bad I cannot update it on Windows 7 too because of the forced upgrade crap they put in after version 62, which I don't like at all.
    Also their greed for user's data with constant nagging about sync feature makes me not trust Mozilla anymore.
    So, I don't know what to say, I'm wayting for an ungoogled-chromium of Firefox.
    The sync feature is not a problem, Firefox sync uses your password/passprhase to generate key and encrypts it on your machine/device before uploading. Mozilla has no access to your data. Theya couple of years ago actually spend a lot of time (maybe over a year) on making this protocol/system. Mozilla didn't want to get any government coming to them asking for any data, they don't want any access to it. It's similar to e2e messaging (although these days that could get the government on your neck too *sad face*).

    Leave a comment:


  • Brane215
    replied
    Originally posted by dlq84 View Post

    Yeah, but it doesn't make sense to add/enable support until the spec is final, or they will have to support draft versions.

    Once they believe the spec is stable enough I'm sure they will enable it. Until then you can use cURL to test it.
    Why not ? AFAIK Chrome has to be started with --enable-quic or somesuch option.

    FF could do the same or similar. Like, having a bool within about://config that has to be flipped on.

    This way, it could be used for testing ( server as well as client) without support obligation outside of that particular test.
    Last edited by Brane215; 23 October 2019, 09:08 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • dlq84
    replied
    Originally posted by Brane215 View Post

    But the firefox that supports it ahs been anounced ( as well as Chrome).

    I tried latest verison of bothj on the test page:




    And it still reports access through TCP4 rather than UDP.

    I'd like to have good client tool for testing...



    Yeah, but it doesn't make sense to add/enable support until the spec is final, or they will have to support draft versions.

    Once they believe the spec is stable enough I'm sure they will enable it. Until then you can use cURL to test it.

    Leave a comment:


  • treba
    replied
    Originally posted by grigi View Post

    On my plasma X11 desktop I get the same massive trackpad improvements. It really makes a tremendous improvement! (I didn't do anything, on Gentoo)
    Yep, just updated, too, and scrolling improved heavily. Awesome release!

    Leave a comment:


  • grigi
    replied
    Originally posted by holunder View Post
    This version is using kinetic/momentum scrolling of GTK 3 if you’re using a trackpad (at least on Arch). That makes a tremendous difference! Together with WebRender improvements, we now have macOS-class buttery soft scrolling. If it doesn’t work for you, you have to enable hardware acceleration and MOZ_USE_XINPUT2=1, see here: https://www.frumble.de/blog/2017/03/...beschleunigung (in German, but you can use a translation service).
    On my plasma X11 desktop I get the same massive trackpad improvements. It really makes a tremendous improvement! (I didn't do anything, on Gentoo)

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X