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GNOME 3.34.1 Released With Latest Fixes

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  • phoronix
    started a topic GNOME 3.34.1 Released With Latest Fixes

    GNOME 3.34.1 Released With Latest Fixes

    Phoronix: GNOME 3.34.1 Released With Latest Fixes

    GNOME 3.34.1 is out as the first point release to last month's big GNOME 3.34 desktop debut...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag....34.1-Released

  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by sabian2008 View Post

    I just tried it and Alt+← goes back. This is what I always use to go back one level in any UI so this shrinking isn't a problem if you are keyboard friendly.
    Thanks, I didn't know this.
    But even with this, it still makes it more difficult to get an overview at a glimpse. It reduces the usability and user friendliness of the application. Every time you enter a section the menu disappear and the brain does an context switch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by jacob View Post

    For most people at least, that's absolutely not true. In most cases you need at least a couple of GNOME extensions to have a functional and productive desktop, and you can't really manage extensions without Tweaks. For that reason alone I find myself using GNOME Tweaks much more often than I would like to, and I agree that it basically sucks. More precisely it feels like a dumping ground for tools and settings that should really be incorporated into the main user interface, but they never bothered to try to come up with a sufficiently well designed UI for them.
    You can manage extensions from GNOME Software or run gnome-shell-extensison-prefs

    Leave a comment:


  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by perpetually high View Post
    Regarding the new release, GNOME 3.34 is so damn fast it's scary. Year of the Linux desktop without a doubt arrived in 2019. Tell the historians I was here.
    Objectively not quite yet, albeit it's getting closer. The graphical stack (drivers etc.) is in a much better shape now but it's still a little bit of a mess, 3D-intensive software (games) may or may not work on Joe User's computer, the X11-Wayland transition is causing pains. Installing third party apps got a lot easier with snap and flatpak but there are still many rough edges to solve there too.

    Leave a comment:


  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by Britoid View Post

    So don't make it small?

    It's not like you use GNOME Tweaks a lot anyway, I don't even bother to install it anymore.
    For most people at least, that's absolutely not true. In most cases you need at least a couple of GNOME extensions to have a functional and productive desktop, and you can't really manage extensions without Tweaks. For that reason alone I find myself using GNOME Tweaks much more often than I would like to, and I agree that it basically sucks. More precisely it feels like a dumping ground for tools and settings that should really be incorporated into the main user interface, but they never bothered to try to come up with a sufficiently well designed UI for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • aaahaaap
    replied
    Sounds like there should be a setting that signals you're on a desktop/non-desktop that prevents/enables the responsive layout?

    Leave a comment:


  • perpetually high
    replied
    uid313 is right. It took me until yesterday to realize why Tweaks was glitching on 3.34. Turned out the default window size is too small when it first opens. (1920x1080 resolution here). The solution is to either maximize the window or resize a little bigger.

    I'm still not sure how to get it to do that as the default behavior, so if anyone knows, do tell please.

    Regarding the new release, GNOME 3.34 is so damn fast it's scary. Year of the Linux desktop without a doubt arrived in 2019. Tell the historians I was here.

    Leave a comment:


  • sabian2008
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post

    When the GNOME Tweaks window is small it collapses the sidebar, this makes navigation much more cumbersome as you have to press the back button in the toolbar to bring you back to the section selector screen, then click the section to take you that section. It is twice amount of clicks, and also makes browsing and getting a glimpse or overview of things much more difficult.
    The workaround is to either run GNOME Tweaks as a maximized window, or resize the window until its big enough to trigger the responsive breakpoint that switches it from mobile to desktop mode.
    I just tried it and Alt+← goes back. This is what I always use to go back one level in any UI so this shrinking isn't a problem if you are keyboard friendly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by Britoid View Post
    It's not like you use GNOME Tweaks a lot anyway, I don't even bother to install it anymore.
    In fact, uid313 doesn't use it at all as he keeps saying he likes distro defaults and he doesn't like to change settings.

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by Britoid View Post

    So don't make it small?

    It's not like you use GNOME Tweaks a lot anyway, I don't even bother to install it anymore.
    But I don't need it to be maximized. I also don't need it to be any larger than what it is when it switches mode to where it collapses the side bar.
    Also, this is not only for GNOME Tweaks, this is also for GNOME Web (Epiphany), and I fear it might be coming to other applications soon too.
    I don't think that Epiphany gets as negatively impacted as GNOME Tweaks though.

    Originally posted by Black_Fox View Post

    On 3.32 I can't even make it small; something like 900x650 is the smallest I can go. Can you check whether this is the point where the smaller responsive design kicks in?
    I can resize it down to 750x654 pixels.

    Leave a comment:

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