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Geometric Picking Finally Lands In GNOME/Mutter 3.34 For Lowering CPU Usage

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  • #21
    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
    I can’t see how a VM can pull of any magic when the host need to run as well.
    Virtualbox or VMWare Workstation/player VMs are just a bunch of processes running on the host. That's what Type 2 Hypervisors do https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervisor.

    Giving the VM multiple cores in these programs only means you let the guest VM's OS split its own processes over available cores instead of relying on the hypervisor to do it. It's generally better to do that if the guest VM OS is capable of multi-core operation as the guest OS usually knows better than the hypervisor. But still, the hypervisor can split things up in multiple processes, even if inefficiently, so you can't claim the VM is "running in single core".

    You are not fully dedicating a core to the VM (i.e. removing its access to the host system) unless you are actually asking for this feature and using a Type 1 Hypervisor like KVM, Xen, Esxi, Hyper-V and friends.

    For example, I have 2 VMs open at the moment in VMWare Workstation, each with 4 cores "assigned" to each, so total 8 cores "needed".

    The host is a 4 core CPU (tecnically it's a dualcore with HT because it's a laptop CPU), and it's fine.
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 09-03-2019, 05:39 AM.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by timrichardson View Post
      The Canonical dev's contributions in that thread are a masterpiece of patience and control, as it took a year and lots of obstruction to get the patch merged,despite overwhelming evidence in his favour.
      You can say that again. A ton of his pull requests have been blocked for months for stuff as important as commit messages not to the taste of Stavracas, for instance. Daniel has been schooling them for two years now on their shoddy code and they absolutely hate him for it, even though they're responsible for the abysmal state of gnome shell and mutter in terms of performance.
      Last edited by royce; 09-03-2019, 05:41 AM.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by boxie View Post

        so I have a genuine question - I was using an ubuntu 19.04 live cd the other day (amd cpu+gpu) and gnome felt "slow". As this is my only experience recently - are you saying that a 19.10 live cd (assuming it has gnome 3.34 and ignoring live usb disk access penalties) should feel snappy? If so, that could be quite cool!
        Some delays in the GNOME desktop are intentional. For example, this extension https://extensions.gnome.org/extensi...delay-removal/ removes the ~0.5 second delay before the popup appears after pressing ALT-TAB to switch between application windows. Not sure why there are various intentional delays in the UI, but evidently some of them can be bypassed.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
          What is the point of having release candidates if they pop things like this in days before a release? Either include it in the next release, or if the patch is worth waiting for, delay the release and get it tested by users
          This is a very good question, though this particular commit seem to have been pretty well tested by multiple users. Still defeats the purpose of release candidates and freezes though...

          In Gnome 3.28 there was so much bugs, it took very long time to patch that up https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/mutte...its/gnome-3-28 . No trace of "Mutter is used on enterprise class distributions. You can’t allow that to regress." there...

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          • #25
            Originally posted by timrichardson View Post

            I think what I'm saying is for sure you would not like 18.04 I found 19.04 to be a big step forwards, so did many reviewers. But I use it on intel and optimus laptops, I don't yet have any AMD hardware. And we refer specifically to mutter stuff: composition, not things like app launching (in other words, for the scope of this, there can't be a USB penalty).
            They've been maintaining Gnome in 18.04 very well and backporting patches, it's quite ok. And you have the Ubuntu HWE 18.04.3 stuff also...

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            • #26
              seeing how much performance can yet be gained in gnome says a lot about its current state, doesn't it.

              for the record, i am using gnome on my laptop.

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              • #27
                starshipeleven Configuration is limited to 1 physical cpu. Guest VM: latest ubuntu 19.10 beta. Smooth.

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                • #28
                  yoshi314 current state says nothing about future potential. For the first time desktop linux got enough man power and the right tools to make one compositor succeed.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
                    starshipeleven Configuration is limited to 1 physical cpu.
                    Check Task Manager or process monitor or whatever. You will see multiple Virtualbox or VMWare processes for that VM (usually at least 2 per VM), regardless of how much CPUs or cores you give the VM in the config.

                    I'm not shitting on GNOME, I'm just pointing out that VMs don't work like that. You can't "limit CPU usage" for a VM with type 2 hypervisors, at most you screw with the guest's kernel scheduling by telling it there are only X cores. CPU processing power is shared, no matter what you do.

                    EDIT: on Virtualbox there is a slider for "Execution Cap", which is the only way to limit CPU resources used by the VM. Afaik VmWare does not have a similar setting.
                    Last edited by starshipeleven; 09-03-2019, 09:47 AM.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
                      yoshi314 current state says nothing about future potential. For the first time desktop linux got enough man power and the right tools to make one compositor succeed.
                      Agree! And they're actually looking at the all the tricky details, together. Maybe KWin will make it also...

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