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Geometric Picking Finally Lands In GNOME/Mutter 3.34 For Lowering CPU Usage

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  • #11
    Well, one thing is for sure. Mutter is already startling compared to say a year/year & a half ago, and the numbers on this new patch are quite remarkable, so ubuntu 19.10 should be a revelation for anyone on 18.04. And hats off to the decision-makers who pulled in the MR at the last moment. I think the praise which will follow this next gnome release will make everyone feel quite good about the co-operation behind these performance improvements.

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    • #12
      timrichardson True. This work brings many benefits. But it’s not without cost to have developers like vanvugt. He puts a lot of peer pressure on the maintainers because he tags most MRs as performance related and use hyperbole commit messages.

      statistics on closed MRs: 41 of 113 came from vanvugt. That’s too much and basically a behavioral problem.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by cl333r View Post

        What "color picking operations" are going on while moving the mouse and playing an OpenGL game??
        I'll take a stab - how about RTS's and RPG's that involve a mouse? (examples: Surviving Mars / Pillars of Eternity)

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        • #14
          Originally posted by timrichardson View Post
          Well, one thing is for sure. Mutter is already startling compared to say a year/year & a half ago, and the numbers on this new patch are quite remarkable, so ubuntu 19.10 should be a revelation for anyone on 18.04. And hats off to the decision-makers who pulled in the MR at the last moment. I think the praise which will follow this next gnome release will make everyone feel quite good about the co-operation behind these performance improvements.
          so I have a genuine question - I was using an ubuntu 19.04 live cd the other day (amd cpu+gpu) and gnome felt "slow". As this is my only experience recently - are you saying that a 19.10 live cd (assuming it has gnome 3.34 and ignoring live usb disk access penalties) should feel snappy? If so, that could be quite cool!

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          • #15
            boxie it’s smooth on a single core VM.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by boxie View Post

              so I have a genuine question - I was using an ubuntu 19.04 live cd the other day (amd cpu+gpu) and gnome felt "slow". As this is my only experience recently - are you saying that a 19.10 live cd (assuming it has gnome 3.34 and ignoring live usb disk access penalties) should feel snappy? If so, that could be quite cool!
              I think what I'm saying is for sure you would not like 18.04 I found 19.04 to be a big step forwards, so did many reviewers. But I use it on intel and optimus laptops, I don't yet have any AMD hardware. And we refer specifically to mutter stuff: composition, not things like app launching (in other words, for the scope of this, there can't be a USB penalty).

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              • #17
                Originally posted by boxie View Post

                so I have a genuine question - I was using an ubuntu 19.04 live cd the other day (amd cpu+gpu) and gnome felt "slow". As this is my only experience recently - are you saying that a 19.10 live cd (assuming it has gnome 3.34 and ignoring live usb disk access penalties) should feel snappy? If so, that could be quite cool!
                Try Fedora, Ubuntu ships with older versions of Mesa, still uses Xorg and bundles GNOME extensions famous for causing performance issues (e.g. Desktop Icons). It never has been the greatest example of GNOME.

                Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
                timrichardson True. This work brings many benefits. But it’s not without cost to have developers like vanvugt. He puts a lot of peer pressure on the maintainers because he tags most MRs as performance related and use hyperbole commit messages.
                Originally posted by 144Hz View Post

                statistics on closed MRs: 41 of 113 came from vanvugt. That’s too much and basically a behavioral problem.

                There's also extra wasted time when regressions/bugs for these unmerged patches get filed upstream because downstream distros have shipped them by default in their stable repos.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
                  boxie it’s smooth on a single core VM.
                  Single core in the sense of "restricted to the usage of 1 core" or "exposing 1 core to the VM"

                  Because afaik Virtualbox and VMWare don't restrict core usage. They can fool the VM into thinking it's running on a single core but in practice you see more than one core used on the host.

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                  • #19
                    starshipeleven "restricted to the usage of 1 core" out of 2 physical meager cores on the host system. I can’t see how a VM can pull of any magic when the host need to run as well. In this case it seem more likely the host cannibalizes cpu from the guest.

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                    • #20
                      What is the point of having release candidates if they pop things like this in days before a release? Either include it in the next release, or if the patch is worth waiting for, delay the release and get it tested by users

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