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GNOME Launches Coding Education Challenge With $500k In Funding

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  • GNOME Launches Coding Education Challenge With $500k In Funding

    Phoronix: GNOME Launches Coding Education Challenge With $500k In Funding

    The GNOME Foundation has kicked off their Coding Education Challenge for promoting programming around free/open-source software and with Endless Computers providing the $500,000 USD for prize money...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...e-Ed-Challenge

  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by moilami View Post
    But programming is good to teach in schools like languages and mathematics is good to teach.
    I think about 1 year of mandatory computer science is enough, in K-12. And, really, I mean high school, when kids have enough mathematics background to appreciate it. By that point, you'd have gotten deep enough into programming to know if it appeals to you and to have a basic sense of how most software works.

    My high school actually offered 2.5 years of CS, but the minimum was 0.5 years. Of that, I took 1.5 years, testing out of 1 year worth. And it was all pure CS - no BSing about with robotics, games, VR, or crap like that. That stuff might be fun for after-school or summer camps, but I think you can waste a lot of time on it without really covering much of the fundamentals of CS.

    Leave a comment:


  • moilami
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    I think uid313 was talking about professionals.

    Someone who doesn't know what the Insert key does probably doesn't have any particular passion for computers or programming. That means that they're likely to put the minimal amount of effort into their work, which (unless they're a genius) means loads of crap code. This is how you get buggy, insecure products, or at least makes more work for everyone else on the team.

    Software development should not be a default career choice. I'm 100% supportive of making tech available for kids and noobs, and even giving all students a rudimentary understanding of programming. From there, they will sort themselves - those with the right temperament will gravitate towards it, while everyone else will tend to drift away. You don't need to push and lure and cajole loads of kids into the profession. That's not actually good for anyone - even those kids, who will probably not be very successful or fulfilled in their careers and meanwhile might've missed out on their true calling.
    Extremely well said. Everyone does not have to become a programmer, it would be a ruin, plenty of talent wasted and abused.

    But programming is good to teach in schools like languages and mathematics is good to teach.

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
    Sounds like the average Rust dev.
    No, Rust is a programming language that is not the first language someone picks up or something that is taught in school or a popular 30 day course.
    The worst offenders are web developers, people who took a course in React without knowing JavaScript, or people who do WordPress. So they code some PHP and JavaScript without understanding what executes on the web server and what executes in the web browser.

    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    While anyone is encouraged to join, it does not mean they are *forced* to. If they don't want to join, they can simply ignore the program.
    Let's hope this will do something because I'm tired of his
    Yeah, but there are students who are 18 and have never written code in their life, and they get told they can become programmers, they hear its popular, and its for the future, there are job opportunities, and they don't know what they want to do so they go for that. They hate reading documentation and think its a boring chore, they don't keep themselves up to date with API changes in new releases of software frameworks and libraries. These people are not passionate about programming.

    Leave a comment:


  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by programmerjake View Post
    Everyone has to discover something for the first time, just because they haven't found out how the Insert key works doesn't mean that they can't program well:
    I think uid313 was talking about professionals.

    Someone who doesn't know what the Insert key does probably doesn't have any particular passion for computers or programming. That means that they're likely to put the minimal amount of effort into their work, which (unless they're a genius) means loads of crap code. This is how you get buggy, insecure products, or at least makes more work for everyone else on the team.

    Software development should not be a default career choice. I'm 100% supportive of making tech available for kids and noobs, and even giving all students a rudimentary understanding of programming. From there, they will sort themselves - those with the right temperament will gravitate towards it, while everyone else will tend to drift away. You don't need to push and lure and cajole loads of kids into the profession. That's not actually good for anyone - even those kids, who will probably not be very successful or fulfilled in their careers and meanwhile might've missed out on their true calling.

    Leave a comment:


  • dkasak
    replied
    Trolling software releases is one thing. But those who troll a half-million-dollar coding education challenge really need to do some more self-reflection, and probably some more therapy sessions.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by AsciiWolf View Post
    Well, I hope this could at least lead to fixing some bugs in GNOME Shell, GNOME Software and other important parts of the GNOME desktop, where many bugs stay unfixed because "there is not enough money and developers to work on them".
    To be honest I doubt this will be the case because the outcome of this program most likely will be semi-experienced programmers that wouldn't like to stay in the project.

    First it was diversity, now inclusion, and what's the future? Forced inclusion?

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313.
    I don't think coding education is needed, those who want to learn can easily learn by themselves. I don't think coding should be pushed upon everyone, else you have to work with people who work as programmers even though they should have been plumbers, mechanics or or carpenters. These people produce shitty code, and have no understanding of a computer.

    I've had co-workers come to me saying code gets erased when they typed, I went over to their computer and pressed the "Insert" button on the keyboard. These people are developers.
    While anyone is encouraged to join, it does not mean they are *forced* to. If they don't want to join, they can simply ignore the program.
    Let's hope this will do something because I'm tired of his

    Leave a comment:


  • programmerjake
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    I've had co-workers come to me saying code gets erased when they typed, I went over to their computer and pressed the "Insert" button on the keyboard. These people are developers.
    Everyone has to discover something for the first time, just because they haven't found out how the Insert key works doesn't mean that they can't program well:

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    I don't think they'd like my proposals of "Drop CSD" and "GTK4 should be a GTK3 compat layer to QT5".
    I can't wait for browsers to start rolling their own methods of rendering decoration then to support a feature supported on macOS and Windows.

    Leave a comment:

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