Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chrome 76 Released With Flash Blocked By Default

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Chrome 76 Released With Flash Blocked By Default

    Phoronix: Chrome 76 Released With Flash Blocked By Default

    Google today promoted their Chrome 76 web-browser to stable for all supported platforms, including Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...me-76-Released

  • #2
    Call Steve Jobs all the names you want, but his decision to block Flash on Apple devices was the turning point to a Flash free Web.

    Too bad today we still have the same annoying, heavy to load and play, loud and obnoxious, malware packing popups of yore. But hey, at last we don't need to think about much worse performance on multimedia pages compared to Windows. And a compĺete Adobe-free Linux desktop (no need of Adobe Reader too).

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
      But hey, at last we don't need to think about much worse performance on multimedia pages compared to Windows.
      Instead we have browser vendors who refuse to implement or haven't finished implementing hardware accelerated video decoding officially for Linux. At least with Flash you could have made a simple configuration file change to enable that.

      Try playing a HQ video in a browser on an ultrabook with Edge (not the chromium one) and with official build of any browser for Linux. The difference in power use is noticeable. I know that there are ready made alternative builds of chromium that enable the needed bits, but that is still not official support and relies either on the distribution or yourself to apply patches and compile it (which requires beefy hardware). Using a community-built browser poses a potential security risk so it's not optimal either.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by numacross View Post
        Instead we have browser vendors who refuse to implement or haven't finished implementing hardware accelerated video decoding officially for Linux. At least with Flash you could have made a simple configuration file change to enable that.
        Performance means nothing when it is content in a proprietary format making it not viewable for a lot of people. I'm so glad Flash is almost in the grave. Way way way too many issues.

        The issues you point to do not prevent people from viewing anything. It's just a nicety.

        Comment


        • #5
          Long overdue.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am still waiting for Unicode Version 11.0 to be supported by Chrome with standard font on Linux.
            It's impressive how all other browser can manage it and Google fails (or is it on purpose to force using fonts so that users can be traced in even more ways?).
            I am waiting to use some of those emoji on my website - so just annoying to wait just for Chrome. Maybe Firefox will support Unicode 12 before Chrome manages to Display 11 ...
            Concerning Flash - due to fixed keyboard shortcuts it was never suited for playing ... but there are other choices for that.
            And Flash videos are obsolete long ago - it least I have not seen one for a long time.
            HW video decoding ... would be nice ... I am just wondering why everybody seems to use Chrome when it is lacking in so many ways ...
            But maybe it's just my personal taste. And concerning web browsers Linux is no one's darling any more ... just sad.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by numacross View Post

              Instead we have browser vendors who refuse to implement or haven't finished implementing hardware accelerated video decoding officially for Linux. At least with Flash you could have made a simple configuration file change to enable that.

              Try playing a HQ video in a browser on an ultrabook with Edge (not the chromium one) and with official build of any browser for Linux. The difference in power use is noticeable. I know that there are ready made alternative builds of chromium that enable the needed bits, but that is still not official support and relies either on the distribution or yourself to apply patches and compile it (which requires beefy hardware). Using a community-built browser poses a potential security risk so it's not optimal either.
              FYI this is still primarily driver issues, Fedora actually had to move their vaapi builds of Chromium into a separate package because having it as the default was breaking too often.

              Comment


              • #8
                Using a community-built browser poses a potential security risk so it's not optimal either.
                This is not true ! However I agree that there are still problems with hardware acceleration on some specific hardware due to the drivers, this is why browsers do not enable it by default in Gnu / Linux.

                Edit. Another new feature of this Chrome release is that now if you use a dark system theme, the address bar will no longer be white.

                Last edited by Charlie68; 07-31-2019, 05:02 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  To all Chrome users out there, may I suggest you try Firefox?
                  It is great!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                    To all Chrome users out there, may I suggest you try Firefox?
                    It is great!
                    Firefox is pre-installed on all Linux systems, do you think Linux users don't know Firefox? but I don't understand why every time we talk about Chrome, someone has to recommend Firefox, I use both and live quietly.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X