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Firefox 68 Performance Is Looking Good With WebRender On Linux

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  • Firefox 68 Performance Is Looking Good With WebRender On Linux

    Phoronix: Firefox 68 Performance Is Looking Good With WebRender On Linux

    With Firefox 67 having released this week, Firefox 68 is in beta and its performance from our tests thus far on Ubuntu Linux are looking real good. In particular, if enabling the WebRender option that remains off by default on Linux, there are some nice performance gains especially.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=27894

  • #2
    They cutting your PC resources for performance improvements.
    Firefox 67 now using 5-6%% RAM for only one opened tab. While Firefox 66 - "only" 3-4%%.
    CPU usage also noticeably higher. https://www.khronos.org/registry/vul...ml/vkspec.html (huge page) is a good test.

    One day it would work as a lightning, and would replace ... systemd.
    ;-)

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    • #3
      Thanks for the benchmarks! As for motionmark, I also ran it a couple of days ago and in at least one test the performance was so bad that I guessed it was a bug/regression. Good to see that FF68 is back to previous speed there and awesome how webrender start to improve things here! Motionmark and other render heavy benchmarks are those which should benefit from it, in contrast to js benchmarks.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wpupkin View Post
        They cutting your PC resources for performance improvements.
        Firefox 67 now using 5-6%% RAM for only one opened tab. While Firefox 66 - "only" 3-4%%.
        CPU usage also noticeably higher. https://www.khronos.org/registry/vul...ml/vkspec.html (huge page) is a good test.
        Although I'm not happy about higher RAM usage, if the CPU usage is proportionately higher along with the level of added performance, I don't see that as a problem. As far as I'm concerned, that could just mean the CPU is more properly utilized.

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        • #5
          "looking good" is a bit of a stretch when it is only mostly one benchmark that is faster, hm? comparison with chromium anyone?
          Last edited by rene; 05-23-2019, 01:21 PM.

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          • #6
            Chrome is still #1, another fail for rust

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rene View Post
              "looking good" it a bit of a stretch when it is only mostly one benchmark that is faster, hm? comparison with chromium anyone?
              Well the good news is it does not regress in any case. And in every benchmark tested the performance with webrender was slightly better than without. Which is actually quite nice considering that in the js heavy benchmarks webrender can only reduce cpu usage of the rendering a bit.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by treba View Post

                Well the good news is it does not regress in any case. And in every benchmark tested the performance with webrender was slightly better than without. Which is actually quite nice considering that in the js heavy benchmarks webrender can only reduce cpu usage of the rendering a bit.
                while "does not regress" is at least something, probably the bar for new development should be higher than "does not regress", … – but yeah, at least it does not regress (in these benchmarks)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rene View Post

                  while "does not regress" is at least something, probably the bar for new development should be higher than "does not regress", … – but yeah, at least it does not regress (in these benchmarks)
                  Webrender is the biggest step in browser rendering architecture since the late 90s AFAIK. This is the first release that ships with it and it does so on all major operating systems but android at once (although deactivated by default almost everywhere). I wouldn't be surprised at all if it would regress at least on some systems/OSs. Both FF and chromium have had troubles for years to enable hardware accelerated rendering on linux. If FF manages to finally to do it with one single revolutionary cross platform engine, which by the way still has many low hanging fruits and therefore enormous potential performance wise, ... I call that a great step

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                  • #10
                    Michael phoronix How does FF66 win in the geometric mean? Did the test before where "less is more" get factored in incorrectly?
                    Last edited by FireBurn; 05-24-2019, 09:46 AM.

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