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The Current Windows 10 vs. Linux Browser Performance For Google Chrome + Mozilla Firefox

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  • #61
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    2D acceleration has always been faster on Windows than on Linux because Windows has a better suited architecture for that.

    Also your "shit-ton of performance options are disabled on Linux" is nothing but lies. I've never heard of anything that Mozilla deliberately disables for Linux. In fact last time I checked they use the same compiler (clang) and compilation options for Windows, MacOS and Linux.

    But I presume you're a fanboy and you hate to see the hard facts that Linux still sucks, so you invent all sorts of BS to justify Linux' poor performance.
    There are quite a few performance settings that can be changed that makes Firefox a hell of a lot more responsive on Linux. Did a quick scan of my about:config and here are some of the more important ones I've set. Like I posted earlier, Google is your friend.

    gfx.webrender.all
    webgl.msaa.force
    webgl.force.enable
    gl.msaa.level (I set it to 4)
    gfx.webrender.enable
    gfx.canvas.azure.accelerated (doesn't exist by default; you'll want it true)
    layout.display-list.retain.chrome
    layers.acceleration.force-enabled
    dom.webgpu.enable
    media.av1.enabled
    media.av1.use-dav1d
    media.gpu-process-decoder
    browser.preferences.defaultPerformanceSettings.ena bled (you'll want that to be false)

    Except for the last one and the msaa level, they should all be set to true. Yeah, I have x4 msaa enabled in Firefox. It's an option so why not?
    Last edited by skeevy420; 04-04-2019, 10:42 AM. Reason: typo

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
      Prior to Windows 8? this was not an issue. This is a design decision from MS. It doesn't have to be.
      I don't mean that Windows' core design technically forces updates to interrupt work, just that it's a current technical feature of Windows.

      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
      Yes, packages (and ports) are very handy. Why do they exist? Because often the budgets of developers doesn't spread so far to have a web presence to advertise their wares. I think it also stemmed from the old BBSs and usenet.
      Likewise, because of the vast swathe of MS Windows users, dozens of magazines, web site reviews point people to software. Software is in stores, on shelves. It's just a different model, again, and just can't be compared. Of course, finally, there's also cost.
      But my point is that I don't have to hit 20 different websites to get Java, Python, VLC, emacs, Chromium, Shotwell, etc... etc... and then click through each installer.

      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
      Benchmarks are nice eye candy, but, realistically, most businesses that have MS windows desktop/server do so for convenience and a better pool of knowledge. I suspect very few would look at benchmarks for the disk filesystem and decline to use MS. Everything looks fast on SANs populated by SSDs.
      Maybe it's an unusual case, but I use git on a very large codebase. git status, git diff, git checkout, etc... finish in fractions of a second on Linux even with traditional spinning platter drives. On my work laptop with Windows 10 and an SSD, even with antivirus completely off the operations take many seconds. It's maddening, and the entire team experiences it.

      For smaller git repos with shorter histories, there is no such pain. But my employer makes me regret that they replaced my Linux laptop with a Windows one every single work day.

      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
      Again, this is a matter of commercial versus 'free'. It's comparing Apples/Oranges, basically. Unless you want to correlate it to the browser benchmarks here, which perfectly illustrate that commercial Google sees merit in making their browsers more efficient on MS because GNU/Linux and BSD users have the reputation of not wanting to pay for anything; deserved or not. Mozilla knows it's got more eyeballs in windows than linux. (personally, firefox is a load of garbage now, bloated and slow and tries to look too much like windows 10 gui - ack!).
      Windows users aren't paying Google or Mozilla anything for Chrome or Firefox either. Google and Mozilla don't focus on Windows because Linux and BSD users are cheap, they focus on Windows because Windows still has 90% of consumer desktops worldwide.

      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
      Again, this is a commercial decision. Desktop users have no need to log in other than once. MS knows this, that's how they design it.
      The whole HTTP/HTML thing is making logging in by individual users into Unix systems somewhat of an historical legacy. It's all web interfaces and the like.
      I grant your second point. On your first one, I worked at a small business -- too small to get any serious attention from Microsoft sales and support. So we were constantly running into licensing errors with remote desktop logins. We set up some Linux servers, put Xfce and Xrdp on them, and the problem was solved - the only time we had login problems was when the servers were overloaded. But it's better to have a server with ten people logged in and active struggle when an eleventh person tries than to have a server that balks on the sixth login for licensing reasons while it's mostly idle because four of the people logged in haven't done anything with that session in ten minutes.

      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
      I'm not mentioning systemd here...
      If you can use bash but you can't modify systemd .service files, there's something wrong with you.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by chithanh View Post
        There is no need for such. A terminal is enough.
        Sure, but PTS doesn't work directly on ChromeOS, even with root access.

        Originally posted by chithanh View Post
        Also even for the Chromebooks that have no official Linux application support, crouton was available.
        Lolwut? The question raised was about measuring the native Chrome browser, natively on ChromeOS. If you install crouton, you can't measure the native Chrome browser natively on ChromeOS, only the stuff inside crouton.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

          There are quite a few performance settings that can be changed that makes Firefox a hell of a lot more responsive on Linux. Did a quick scan of my about:config and here are some of the more important ones I've set. Like I posted earlier, Google is your friend.

          gfx.webrender.all
          webgl.msaa.force
          webgl.force.enable
          gl.msaa.level (I set it to 4)
          gfx.webrender.enable
          gfx.canvas.azure.accelerated (doesn't exist by default; you'll want it true)
          layout.display-list.retain.chrome
          layers.acceleration.force-enabled
          dom.webgpu.enable
          media.av1.enabled
          media.av1.use-dav1d
          media.gpu-process-decoder
          browser.preferences.defaultPerformanceSettings.ena bled (you'll want that to be false)

          Except for the last one and the msaa level, they should all be set to true. Yeah, I have x4 msaa enabled in Firefox. It's an option so why not?
          All these options are enabled on Windows and disabled on Linux by default? Can't believe it until I see it.

          And after enabling all of them, does Firefox on Linux become noticeably faster? Does it beat Windows 10 in all the tests? I guess you haven't checked.

          Also,

          MSAA is an antialiasing tech, so it can hardly affect 2D performance.
          AV1 is a video codec, so it doesn't not affect 2D performance at all.

          So, what are we down to? Seven different options related to WebRender? gfx.webrender.all, gfx.webrender.enable, gfx.canvas.azure.accelerated, layers.acceleration.force-enabled, dom.webgpu.enable, media.gpu-process-decoder, browser.preferences.defaultPerformanceSettings.ena bled?
          Last edited by birdie; 04-04-2019, 01:14 PM.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by birdie View Post

            All these options are enabled on Windows and disabled on Linux by default? Can't believe it until I see it.

            And after enabling all of them, does Firefox on Linux become noticeably faster? Does it beat Windows 10 in all the tests? I guess you haven't checked.

            Also,

            MSAA is an antialiasing tech, so it can hardly affect 2D performance.
            AV1 is a video codec, so it doesn't not affect 2D performance at all.

            So, what are we down to? Seven different options related to WebRender? gfx.webrender.all, gfx.webrender.enable, gfx.canvas.azure.accelerated, layers.acceleration.force-enabled, dom.webgpu.enable, media.gpu-process-decoder, browser.preferences.defaultPerformanceSettings.ena bled?
            There's more to life than 2D browser performance so I listed some settings that could help media playback and effect appearance (fonts seem better after the msaa settings were enabled; I didn't notice any other change). You asked for settings that can effect performance so I gave you the ones I've changed.

            For me on Manjaro with FF 66.0.2, those were all false by default (or didn't exist and had to be created) and my new tab page went from loading in 3-4 seconds to instantly -- anecdotal, but that combined with no more scrolling lag, screen tearing when scrolling, or video frame syncing issues was all the testing I needed as far as "noticeably faster or better" is concerned. I don't know if they're set by Manjaro or by Mozilla. I'm assuming Mozilla based on what other Phoronix users with different distributions have posted in here and in other Firefox threads...oh, and thanks other Phoronix users for posting your Firefox tips because they've helped me a lot.

            I don't have a Windows PC or installation to check and see what their default Windows values are. Perhaps a dual-booting user will check for us. Perhaps a Premium Member will ask Michael to test with them on and off so we have results from a trusted source...I'm not Premium so that's not a request I'm willing to make.

            For some other settings that were disabled/false by default (at least on my system) that can effect performance:

            layout.display-list.retain.chrome
            media.ffmpeg.low-latency.enabled
            media.gpu-process-decoder
            media.hardware-video-decoding.force-enabled

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

              There's more to life than 2D browser performance so I listed some settings that could help media playback and effect appearance (fonts seem better after the msaa settings were enabled; I didn't notice any other change). You asked for settings that can effect performance so I gave you the ones I've changed.

              For me on Manjaro with FF 66.0.2, those were all false by default (or didn't exist and had to be created) and my new tab page went from loading in 3-4 seconds to instantly -- anecdotal, but that combined with no more scrolling lag, screen tearing when scrolling, or video frame syncing issues was all the testing I needed as far as "noticeably faster or better" is concerned. I don't know if they're set by Manjaro or by Mozilla. I'm assuming Mozilla based on what other Phoronix users with different distributions have posted in here and in other Firefox threads...oh, and thanks other Phoronix users for posting your Firefox tips because they've helped me a lot.

              I don't have a Windows PC or installation to check and see what their default Windows values are. Perhaps a dual-booting user will check for us. Perhaps a Premium Member will ask Michael to test with them on and off so we have results from a trusted source...I'm not Premium so that's not a request I'm willing to make.

              For some other settings that were disabled/false by default (at least on my system) that can effect performance:

              layout.display-list.retain.chrome
              media.ffmpeg.low-latency.enabled
              media.gpu-process-decoder
              media.hardware-video-decoding.force-enabled
              This is why we need to have a wide open dialog about such settings in this forum. Too bad there are so many who come here merely to try to stifle the dialog.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by JeansenVaars View Post
                this is one of the threads that make me ask myself:

                1. I have better battery life in windows
                2. I have games, ms office, photoshop and sony vegas on windows
                3. browsers are faster on windows
                4. My nvidia card works better, no CUDA, gcc and lower level compatibility issues

                then I ask myself why am I here?

                then I answer myself
                1. In linux I can customize my desktop environment with convenient shortcuts
                2. code compiles faster
                3. I have more free RAM available
                4. bash

                Hope I don't ask myself for much longer..
                for me it goes like this:

                1. i3

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
                  [...snip...]

                  Windows users aren't paying Google or Mozilla anything for Chrome or Firefox either. Google and Mozilla don't focus on Windows because Linux and BSD users are cheap, they focus on Windows because Windows still has 90% of consumer desktops worldwide.
                  Of course these browsers are free but Google definitely concentrates on Windows for commercial reasons. They're not in it for altruism. More eyeballs means more money in ads/data harvesting - you don't get that with a small community of open source nerds.
                  The chrome engine seems to be the best; even MS is going to it. Even safari is faster than firefox. So it's no surprise to me about these benchmark results.

                  Mozilla basically are rudderless now following all the trends dictated by MS. They have a dwindling market share, a horrible browser, poor direction and should probably quit the MS eco-system and concentrate on niche open source os like *bsd & linux.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by birdie View Post

                    All these options are enabled on Windows and disabled on Linux by default? Can't believe it until I see it.

                    And after enabling all of them, does Firefox on Linux become noticeably faster? Does it beat Windows 10 in all the tests? I guess you haven't checked.

                    Also,

                    MSAA is an antialiasing tech, so it can hardly affect 2D performance.
                    AV1 is a video codec, so it doesn't not affect 2D performance at all.

                    So, what are we down to? Seven different options related to WebRender? gfx.webrender.all, gfx.webrender.enable, gfx.canvas.azure.accelerated, layers.acceleration.force-enabled, dom.webgpu.enable, media.gpu-process-decoder, browser.preferences.defaultPerformanceSettings.ena bled?
                    I checked a few, couldn't be bothered with all of them. Most either don't exist or are the same default value. However that might depend on actual versions because these defaults might change version to version.

                    I think the basic truth is don't look to mozilla to produce a fast browser. It's more focussed on maintaining a look and feel of windows 10 it seems.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
                      I think the basic truth is don't look to mozilla to produce a fast browser. It's more focussed on maintaining a look and feel of windows 10 it seems.
                      Unfortunately it's the only Linux browser -at least for now- which supports 120+fps

                      Comment

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