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Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

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  • Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

    Phoronix: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

    Mozilla this morning released Firefox 66.0 as the latest version of their open-source, cross-platform web browser...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ox-66-Released

  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
    I don't know, I compile on tmpfs and most temporary stuff on tmpfs, so I've no reason to keep track. I don't touch the SSD often with writes.

    I was just replying to your 24/7 365 days a year comment.
    Try reading the whole thread next time.

    The context was all about whether compiling software is bad because your SSD will die, and that's stupid.

    I don't compile Firefox so I'm just guesstimating here, but let's say it takes 30 minutes to compile and writes 2GB of data. Round up to 50 compiles per day, and that'd be 100GB per day. That's ~350TB over 10 years, which is within the warranty of most SSD drives from what i can see (other than the fact that they only tend to be for 5 years max).

    So if those numbers are accurate, you really could compile Firefox nonstop for 10 years and still not kill your SSD drive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
    So tell me, how many TBs of data do you think a single compilation job writes?
    I don't know, I compile on tmpfs and most temporary stuff on tmpfs, so I've no reason to keep track. I don't touch the SSD often with writes.

    I was just replying to your 24/7 365 days a year comment.

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
    Citation? Unless you have a SSD that writes at like 10 MB/s... that makes no sense, even mathematically. You know there have been stress tests on SSDs and they all died and no, those tests did not last 10+ years as you imply, merely a few months.
    So tell me, how many TBs of data do you think a single compilation job writes?

    Leave a comment:


  • towo2099
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    Drink coffee, do outdoor sports and use software that has binary packages for your use.
    Says the moron who always and constantly tells people to use the amd-wip-kernel. That shows once again your complete incompetence in everything.

    Leave a comment:


  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
    They also last for 10+ years while writing to them 24/7, 365 days a year.
    Citation? Unless you have a SSD that writes at like 10 MB/s... that makes no sense, even mathematically. You know there have been stress tests on SSDs and they all died and no, those tests did not last 10+ years as you imply, merely a few months.

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by lectrode View Post

    I'm very much interested in these SSDs that last 10+ years under constant heavy workloads. I've only ever used m.2, mSATA, and standard 2.5" SSDs (from brands like Transcend, Kingston, and Crucial), and none have lasted more than a year and a half under light workloads (daily usage, primarily browsing email and streaming videos). Not only that, the new, bigger SSDs have less longevity since they cram more storage into individual blocks, which need to be completely re-written in order to change a single bit (certain hybrid SSDs try to mitigate this by using a cache that can sustain more reads/writes).

    What SSDs have you experienced lasting 10+ years?
    I've never actually kept an SSD for 10 years, because their sizes tend to become noticeably too small after 5 years or so for my use. However, I've had multiple ssds for ~5 years and none of them have ever failed (as opposed to a couple failures i have had with older hdds) so I feel pretty comfortable with them. Edit: My current ones are from Samsung and Micron - i don't even recall what my previous ones were. I think i had an Intel one, maybe Western Digital?

    As for warranty, 5 years is pretty standard. A quick glance at just Samsung's website show an 860 Pro with 4800 TB TBW, which would translate to ~32MB per second continuously over 5 years. Now granted, that drive can definitely do faster writes than that. But it's completely unrealistic to assume you are writing at full speed continuously every second of every day. Even just limiting it to 8 hours per day bumps that up to ~100MBps, for 5 years solid. It's extremely unrealistic to think you'd ever hit that many writes on a consumer system even within 10 years, no matter how many times you compile firefox.
    Last edited by smitty3268; 03-26-2019, 09:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • lectrode
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
    They also last for 10+ years while writing to them 24/7, 365 days a year. And that's just the warranty, meaning they'll likely last a lot longer in practice.
    So yeah, it's completely ridiculous to worry about that.
    I'm very much interested in these SSDs that last 10+ years under constant heavy workloads. I've only ever used m.2, mSATA, and standard 2.5" SSDs (from brands like Transcend, Kingston, and Crucial), and none have lasted more than a year and a half under light workloads (daily usage, primarily browsing email and streaming videos). Not only that, the new, bigger SSDs have less longevity since they cram more storage into individual blocks, which need to be completely re-written in order to change a single bit (certain hybrid SSDs try to mitigate this by using a cache that can sustain more reads/writes).

    What SSDs have you experienced lasting 10+ years?

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    Many people are feeling and use other people for their trash like above. A technical fact is that solid state drives do wear when writing. That is why it is good to check your logs that no software spams constantly like people with mental problems.
    They also last for 10+ years while writing to them 24/7, 365 days a year. And that's just the warranty, meaning they'll likely last a lot longer in practice.

    So yeah, it's completely ridiculous to worry about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizard69
    replied
    Haven’t installed yet but I have high hopes for blocking auto play media. I can’t think of anything that irritates me more than getting blasted by audio or video for that matter when I don’t want to hear it.

    Leave a comment:

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