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  • #21
    Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

    Not to mention that some of us find it a major hassle to close down what we're doing and then get our spread of open applications properly restored after a restart. I have a new 6TiB hard drive I bought a month ago and thoroughly tested on a spare machine which is still sitting in its shipping packaging because I keep putting off turning this machine off to install it.
    So, I found out that Ubuntu pesters non technical users about rebooting (even though we might say, just tell me what's the affected software then we can restart only what is needed and at worst log out/log in or restart the X server)
    But there is a new, silly way to damage your computer security. Your computer never crashes, is not noisy anymore, suspend or idling is used instead of shutdown, and even the web browser can run for months/years without crashing! Remember when Firefox was at good risk of crashing when opening a 8000x3000 px image, this got fixed years ago. Hence the biggest security risk is probably using months old browser and its libraries etc. because you have never quit it.

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    • #22
      Looks nice! I'm a bit tempted to try out Fedora now.

      Personally, I'd rather updates just behaved the same way they do now. Windows' update screen is hell.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
        If you are using a good SSD, you may hardly notice it. But in HDD only machines, updates can make your life miserable.
        Right.. year 2019 and no SSD. Cheapest 550+ MB/s SSDs cost $20. Only 128 GB, but the OS should still fit.

        Other than that, there are QoS services for both network and disk I/O. Maybe re-prioritize update processes too? Although most machines have plenty of idle cores.

        A thing not available for the peasants running Windows 10 (there 2 enterprise versions that allows you to choose, but is not what most people use).
        I'm familiar with those Windows updates. Once I forgot to take a screenshot but I started this kiosk web pc that had 46 000 updates in queue. It took 35 minutes to upgrade. Gee, thanks. Yep, it had this crappy slow 5000 rpm hard drive.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by caligula View Post

          I can see that, but as a power user who started with CP/M, I can agree to disagree, but won't want that on my systems TYVM.
          Ah, people prefer different things. A power user of sysadminning probably prefers to go with your approach, while a power user of like VS Code or Photoshop might never update if it doesn't say 'Update and shut down' every once in a while. Having a safe default for kernel updates that is the same default as for iOS, Windows and macOS sounds like a good idea then.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by caligula View Post

            Right.. year 2019 and no SSD. Cheapest 550+ MB/s SSDs cost $20. Only 128 GB, but the OS should still fit.

            Other than that, there are QoS services for both network and disk I/O. Maybe re-prioritize update processes too? Although most machines have plenty of idle cores.



            I'm familiar with those Windows updates. Once I forgot to take a screenshot but I started this kiosk web pc that had 46 000 updates in queue. It took 35 minutes to upgrade. Gee, thanks. Yep, it had this crappy slow 5000 rpm hard drive.
            The pesky 1 hour plus Windows updates is really a irritating thing. On Linux systems running BTRFS updates could have been made simple really. You could snapshot /usr then do updates on that snapshot and then replace /usr with the snapshot in a jiffy most of the time. Sure... It's a bit more involved than just snapshotting /usr but the principle is the same.

            http://www.dirtcellar.net

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            • #26
              Originally posted by waxhead View Post

              On Linux systems running BTRFS updates could have been made simple really. You could snapshot /usr then do updates on that snapshot and then replace /usr with the snapshot in a jiffy most of the time. Sure... It's a bit more involved than just snapshotting /usr but the principle is the same.
              That's not the only issue. The processes that are running might assume a different filesystem layout and content, different ABI versions etc. So you might get graphics corruption, crashes etc.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by caligula View Post
                kiosk web pc that had 46 000 updates in queue. It took 35 minutes to upgrade.
                Those are rookie numbers. It's not the first time I let something like that run overnight and in the morning it's still doing stuff.

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                • #28
                  Hey just a few quick updates as you are shutting down...

                  this reminds me so hard on windows. The few quick updates took an hour...

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by bash2bash View Post
                    Nice eye candy and it will impress users coming from the Windows world.

                    Personally, I think its rather a wasted feature, considering I rarely reboot my desktops, for example when there is a really important kernel update.

                    With MATE, I could easily reach 6+ months without a single reboot. Unfortunately, cinnamon is not that stable and eventually crashes within 3 months of use. Still, a cool boot process will go unnoticed in my case.
                    Just out of curiosity... do you use ECC RAM? Because otherwise, with such long uptime, you could get corrupted memory that end up being saved to disk.

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                    • #30
                      This probably is the useless feature I like the most from Fedora29.
                      Nice to have it enhanced for fedora30.

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