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Fedora 30's Slick Boot Process Is Ready To Go

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  • #11
    Originally posted by utopik View Post

    Update are installed on reboot for quite some times now. When new updates are available, gnome-software asks you tu "reboot and update".
    Meanwhile with silverblue, only a reboot is required.
    Pretty sure the "updates installed on reboot" is a Gnome initiative that Fedora has implemented for its last few releases, as it does Gnome's first-use experience. Updating that way isn't mandatory and it's not in the spins. Folks who need to track changes can update manually or check logs. Most package names flashing on the screen during a manual aren't going to mean much to most users, as they wouldn't in a Windows update.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Up123 View Post
      looks good.

      but installing on updates on boot? is Fedora already merged with Silverblue?
      It's been something in Fedora Workstation for a long time now. Once in a while you click a checkbox to install updates when you go power off your computer, and the next day you come back to the latest updates. It's very pleasant, especially for those not interested in the ins and outs of the system. No buggy Firefox, and no installation activity in the background.

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      • #13
        Nice eye candy and it will impress users coming from the Windows world.

        Personally, I think its rather a wasted feature, considering I rarely reboot my desktops, for example when there is a really important kernel update.

        With MATE, I could easily reach 6+ months without a single reboot. Unfortunately, cinnamon is not that stable and eventually crashes within 3 months of use. Still, a cool boot process will go unnoticed in my case.

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        • #14
          Good.

          Wish it didn't use Plymouth and instead a kernel splash screen but there's no reason why the Linux boot experience looked as bad as it did. It wasn't a feature, it was a bug of doing half a dozen modesets.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Compartmentalisation View Post
            No buggy Firefox
            Eh, Firefox won't break if you skip its updates when the process is active. It's that simple. It also mainly breaks when upgrading between major versions.

            no installation activity in the background.
            Why not? What's the point of this delay when shutting down? Your machine has plenty of power to run stuff in the background. I use a rolling release distro and have updated everything in the background for years, without any issues.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by caligula View Post
              Why not? What's the point of this delay when shutting down? Your machine has plenty of power to run stuff in the background. I use a rolling release distro and have updated everything in the background for years, without any issues.
              Well, it will work a lot more often than not. With the amount of users Fedora has, the number of failing systems because of files updating under running software becomes non-neglible.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by moonlite View Post

                Well, it will work a lot more often than not. With the amount of users Fedora has, the number of failing systems because of files updating under running software becomes non-neglible.
                I can see that, but as a power user who started with CP/M, I can agree to disagree, but won't want that on my systems TYVM.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by caligula View Post
                  Why not? What's the point of this delay when shutting down? Your machine has plenty of power to run stuff in the background. I use a rolling release distro and have updated everything in the background for years, without any issues.
                  If you are using a good SSD, you may hardly notice it. But in HDD only machines, updates can make your life miserable.

                  Anyway, a good distro should always allow you to choose when to do a upgrade. A thing not available for the peasants running Windows 10 (there 2 enterprise versions that allows you to choose, but is not what most people use).

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

                    If you are using a good SSD, you may hardly notice it. But in HDD only machines, updates can make your life miserable.

                    Anyway, a good distro should always allow you to choose when to do a upgrade. A thing not available for the peasants running Windows 10 (there 2 enterprise versions that allows you to choose, but is not what most people use).
                    Not to mention that some of us find it a major hassle to close down what we're doing and then get our spread of open applications properly restored after a restart.

                    I have a new 6TiB hard drive I bought over a month ago and thoroughly tested on a spare machine which is still sitting in its shipping packaging because I keep putting off turning this machine off to install it.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by andyprough View Post
                      Just need a screen for when the updates don't install properly now. Maybe something like this:

                      That will be possible from OSTree.

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