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GNOME Shell + Mutter 3.31.4 Deliver Desktop Performance Improvements

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  • #11
    im pretty sure the clock screen is the screen saver

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    • #12
      The list of merge requests is growing. Soon they need to scale the numbers of maintainers and reviewers because the amount of new developers and stray patchers have increased.

      hopefully they can do this without sacrificing the thorough reviews.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by zzarko View Post
        Regarding Gnome, does someone knows how to get rid of Screen Shield/Curtain/Whatever thing with a clock that pops up every time a computer blanks the screen? I have installed Disable Screen Shield extension on Ubuntu 18.04, but the damn screen is still there after the screen is blanked...

        Also, as I do not use Nautilus or similar programs, I'm too used on commander-type managers like Double Commander, is there an extension that would display external USB drives with option to safely remove them? I have found Removable Drive Menu, but that one just unmounts the drives, it does not turn them off (so I do not see the point of it).
        The current version in Arch seems to have some bug with it. I cannot lock Gnome desktop so I never see this screen anymore. Quite comfy

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        • #14
          I wish they changed the terrible animation in dash of GNOME Shell.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by zzarko View Post
            Regarding Gnome, does someone knows how to get rid of Screen Shield/Curtain/Whatever thing with a clock that pops up every time a computer blanks the screen? I have installed Disable Screen Shield extension on Ubuntu 18.04, but the damn screen is still there after the screen is blanked...
            Ubuntu's Gnome includes a setting I've found blanks and locks the screen even if screen lock is disabled, typically via Gnome Tweaks. I'm not on Ubuntu at the moment, and can't recall the exact name of the setting, but if you install and run dconf-editor, then search on "Ubuntu", the relevant result should be obvious. Just toggle it off.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Veske View Post
              The current version in Arch seems to have some bug with it. I cannot lock Gnome desktop so I never see this screen anymore. Quite comfy
              I've had this twice in Debian (possibly following relevant upgrades?). If it's the same cause, the kiosk-mode feature for preventing screen lock has somehow been enabled. You can hunt it down in dconf-editor, or run
              Code:
              $ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.lockdown disable-lock-screen false

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              • #17
                I remember Gnome 2, and Kde3 was great at his time, but how can an application of Gnome 3 change the permissions of my $HOME directory (no more writable!) without any permission (obviously, it never have to do it!)? Sorry, I'm going to drop from my installed system any Gnome 3/Gtk3 application. Sorry.
                I'll give a chance to Lxqt, then to Windows 10.
                Last edited by frank007; 01-11-2019, 09:49 AM.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by frank007 View Post
                  I remember Gnome 2, and Kde3 was great at his time, but how can an application of Gnome 3 change the permissions of my $HOME directory (no more writable!) without any permission (obviously, it never have to do it!)?
                  I am using Gnome 3 since its beta in 2010, and it never did that to me. I'm pretty sure something else is responsible for your messup.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Venemo View Post

                    I am using Gnome 3 since its beta in 2010, and it never did that to me. I'm pretty sure something else is responsible for your messup.
                    Sorry, trust me, I got that trouble after "that program" was used.
                    About Gtk3: how possible that an indipendent program raises the cpu
                    usage of a different program, both using the Gtk3 libs?
                    Sorry, Gnome3 and Gtk3 libs are shit for me now. Sorry.
                    ---------------
                    My very short story with (GNU/)Linux. (For those who have one minute of their free time to spend)
                    (I am Italian, sorry for my English)

                    I bought my first used PC at the end of 1999. Obviously, Windows 98 was the only O.S.
                    I didn't know nothing about computers and operation systems.
                    In November of that year, I read about Linux on a magazine, a Linux distro was attached.
                    Meanwhile, I discovered everything about Win98. After I read the article in the magazine,
                    I thought Linux was 'maybe for me'. I installed it that month, and decided to use it as my O.S. very soon. Well, Linux was very limited that time (still no usb support, but my PC had none).
                    Then, I installed almost every main distro: Red Hat, Debian, Suse, Mandrake, etc. Mandrake was the better Linux distro ever created, for me.

                    I want to say I saw almost everything about the (GNU/)Linux world since then, and when I say I regret to write what I already wrote you have to trust me. I'm not a hater, I'm only a Linux user like everybody, but I use Linux every time, even after installing it, and I want to keep my very important data safe in my PC.
                    Last edited by frank007; 01-11-2019, 03:08 PM.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by frank007 View Post
                      I remember Gnome 2, and Kde3 was great at his time, [...]
                      If you like GNOME 2 still, give MATE a try. If you like KDE 3 still, give Trinity a try. MATE is the continuation of GNOME 2 while Trinity is the continuation of KDE 3.

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