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Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project

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  • Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project

    Phoronix: Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project

    The Catfish search utility now officially lives under the Xfce umbrella...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ish-Joins-Xfce

  • #2
    There is another binary GTK3 file search tool: https://github.com/konkor/filefinder

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    • #3
      How often do people actually use search on the desktop?

      When I ask this question I mean searching for stuff locally on their computer.

      Doesn't every Linux distro contain mlocate or slocate or whereis and such? I have never understood the need for a search tool on the desktop in the start menu. Just open a terminal, do the search, find what you need and move on. Trying to copy windows because they have it in the start menu to me is a bit weird as they designed there start menu where you need to basically search for everything since it is no longer intuitive where everything is.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
        Trying to copy windows because they have it in the start menu to me is a bit weird as they designed there start menu where you need to basically search for everything since it is no longer intuitive where everything is.
        their* (because people love pointing out typos)

        Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
        How often do people actually use search on the desktop?
        I wonder the same thing. They must suck at organizing if they can't even find where they put their own crap. Or use a proper file manager, with dual panels and so on, not a crappy explorer clone, which is far more useable.

        Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
        Doesn't every Linux distro contain mlocate or slocate or whereis and such?
        Yeah, unfortunately... First thing I do after an install is disable that shit and their stupid cron jobs or timers.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
          How often do people actually use search on the desktop?

          When I ask this question I mean searching for stuff locally on their computer.
          Yeah I do. Both on start menu (KDE's) and in the file manager (dolphin, in KDE).

          Doesn't every Linux distro contain mlocate or slocate or whereis and such? I have never understood the need for a search tool on the desktop in the start menu. Just open a terminal, do the search, find what you need and move on.
          Yeah, but why the heck did I install a GUI for? If your GUI is just there to host terminal windows then what's the point of it? Are you using a tiling windows manager perhaps?

          Mind you, I use yakuake (drop down terminal for KDE) and I'm not afraid of terminal, but I usually do stuff with git or other tools that require direct control from terminal (as there is no decent GUI). For basic PC stuff I fully expect to do it as fast and as effectively from the GUI too, as that's its job.

          Trying to copy windows because they have it in the start menu to me is a bit weird
          Where you think should that be placed for a GUI search function? Start menu is most convenient spot and has a hotkey bound already. Hit the hotkey and start typing, then press enter.

          they designed there start menu where you need to basically search for everything since it is no longer intuitive where everything is.
          Search function was there also in Windows 7 (also in XP, although it was so much less accurate), where the location of stuff was still intuitive

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
            Doesn't every Linux distro contain mlocate or slocate or whereis and such? I have never understood the need for a search tool on the desktop in the start menu. Just open a terminal, do the search, find what you need and move on.
            It doesn't get much quicker/easier than right-click -> search and typing a part of the filename you're looking for (I'm using Thunar's custom actions to add "catfish %f" to the right-click menu for directories). Not only that, you can open the file or open the containing folder of any of the search results with a couple clicks.

            Why it's unfathomable to some that a significant number of people might not want to remember a bunch of commands and type out everything they want to do is beyond me. Even more than that, Linux is the OS of choice: you build your own workflow; you're not forced to use one thing or another, be it GUI or terminal or a mix of both. Why go out of your way to suggest people are doing something wrong when the ability to do things your way is a fundamental feature of an environment?
            Last edited by lectrode; 07-15-2018, 12:22 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lectrode View Post
              Why it's unfathomable to some that a significant number of people might not want to remember a bunch of commands and type out everything they want to do is beyond me. Even more than that, Linux is the OS of choice: you build your own workflow; you're not forced to use one thing or another, be it GUI or terminal or a mix of both. Why go out of your way to suggest people are doing something wrong when the ability to do things your way is a fundamental feature of an environment?
              Some users use Linux computers without even knowing what OS they have. They expect everything to be 100% GUI.

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              • #8
                I don't mind this kind of feature as long as it doesn't create a huge index file in the background without the consent of the user like KDE is doing. find is more than enough for my searching need. Please do not waste my disk space with some index that I will never use...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MNKyDeth View Post
                  Doesn't every Linux distro contain mlocate or slocate or whereis and such? I have never understood the need for a search tool on the desktop in the start menu. Just open a terminal, do the search, find what you need and move on.
                  How about when you have a few thousand office documents on your system for your business and you need to do a key word search? You going to use grep, hope it finds what you need, and then open a file manager and hunt down all the files you get grep hits on so you can preview them and see if they are the right file? That's extremely inefficient. And what about PDF documents? You going to run a separate search with pdfgrep and hope you find what you need? What about all the other file formats people email stuff to you in that isn't recognized by grep?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by caligula View Post
                    Some users use Linux computers without even knowing what OS they have. They expect everything to be 100% GUI.
                    So...correct me if I'm wrong...you're saying using the GUI is wrong because you can't do everything via GUI? We don't need /b/ GUI tool because not everything can be done via GUI? We can't encourage users to make use of the vast array of GUI tools because you can't use them to absolutely everything?

                    IMHO, if people are using Linux and they don't even know it, GUI devs are doing something right since even those users can figure out how to get stuff done on it.

                    There are distributions specifically made for people who are not "tech savvy". They don't need to know how to install an OS because there are commercial options available to purchase laptops and other devices with these distros pre-installed. The vast majority of things any average person would want to accomplish on these can easily be done via GUI. Of the ~20 or so people I've set up to use Manjaro, exactly 2 are remotely interested in learning to run commands from the Terminal (and I encourage them to explore the power of Linux, and even break things so they can figure out how to troubleshoot and fix stuff). The rest have yet to complain about not being able to do /b/. They browse the web, email, store photos and documents, play games on Steam, and that's about it. They don't need to know how to run commands for any of that.
                    Last edited by lectrode; 07-15-2018, 05:08 PM. Reason: remove excess

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