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Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update

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  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update

    Phoronix: Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update

    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...on-28-Features

  • #2
    My favorite thing is that Fedora 28 will have the latest version of systemd-resolved and NetworkManager, which support split DNS. It's incredibly useful when you have a corporate VPN and you want DNS queries of corporate domains to go to the company's DNS servers and all other requests to go to the default DNS servers.

    It can be enabled with:
    Code:
    sudo systemctl enable systemd-resolved
    sudo systemctl start systemd-resolved
    sudo ln -sf /run/systemd/resolve/stub-resolv.conf /etc/resolv.conf
    sudo systemctl restart NetworkManager
    # NetworkManager enables systemd-resolved support by looking at the symlink target of /etc/resolv.conf
    This could be done in older versions systemd-resolved and NetworkManager as well, but there were various bugs that made the feature not so useful.

    This is what the setup looks like, in case anyone is curious: https://gist.github.com/chenxiaolong...828a4d35b74cda

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    • #3
      I <3 Fedora, but take a more conservative approach as I value stability over the latest features. Plus it always takes a few months for 3rd party repos to support the latest release. My strategy has always been when version N is released, I upgrade from N-2 to N-1. So the release of F28 would prompt me to upgrade from F26, to F27. This means I'm consistently running exactly one version below latest. It also means that just about any issue I run into, will already be well documented in the forums what the fix or workaround is.
      Last edited by torsionbar28; 04-24-2018, 08:22 PM.

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      • #4
        If I want bleeding edge, I won't be using Fedora. It's 2018 and they still can't put together a functional rolling release. At least their version of Gnome won't be 6 months out of date this time, so credit them for progress.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by andyprough View Post
          If I want bleeding edge, I won't be using Fedora. It's 2018 and they still can't put together a functional rolling release. At least their version of Gnome won't be 6 months out of date this time, so credit them for progress.
          Fedora Has a Rolling Release, its called Rawhide. just expect things to Break if you use it. as with any Rolling Release Distro, stuff will Break.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Anvil View Post

            Fedora Has a Rolling Release, its called Rawhide. just expect things to Break if you use it. as with any Rolling Release Distro, stuff will Break.
            Debian testing and sid have rolled since year 2000 and have not break. Debian package dependencies prevents system from breaking. What you have is missing or incompatible packages but it is easy to use alternative packages and remove non working. You install Debian testing/sid only once and update when needed.

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            • #7
              Hmm I am looking at Fedora 28 for my laptop ... however I have not used a systemd distro yet ... let's see how it works

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              • #8
                Fedora is really intresting and a good distro, but it is not really good for gaiming in the same sense as a Arch or ubuntu based distro
                Desktop Environment poll:
                https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...de-do-you-like

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Anvil View Post
                  Fedora Has a Rolling Release, its called Rawhide. just expect things to Break if you use it. as with any Rolling Release Distro, stuff will Break.
                  Tumbleweed (OpenSUSE rolling release) does not break, Manjaro and Chakra (Arch derivatives) and Linux Mint Debian (based on Debian Testing) don't. Really it's 2018, the world is ready.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kendji View Post
                    Fedora is really intresting and a good distro, but it is not really good for gaiming in the same sense as a Arch or ubuntu based distro
                    In what sense?

                    ----------------------------------------

                    I really want to be using Flatpaks for things but am finding it difficult to adopt them - so far I've not been able to find a single flatpak that is useful to me. They all seem to overlook things that I think are critical for example:

                    Visual studio code - the paths for things like Python, dotnet are not included in the flatpak definition i.e. things like debugging and linting don't work out of the box.

                    VLC - the paths for the libva drivers aren't included in the flatpak definition i.e. hardware acceleration doesn't work out of the box.

                    GTK file picker user mounts and bookmarks aren't carried over into flatpaks .

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