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DragonFlyBSD's Meltdown Fix Causing More Slowdowns Than Linux

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  • #11
    Originally posted by hiryu View Post
    But not all x86 processors support it​​​
    amd processors do not have meltdown bug in the first place

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    • #12
      Originally posted by pal666 View Post
      amd processors do not have meltdown bug in the first place
      It's not about AMD. Many people don't buy new hardware every day. There are people out there with Core2Duos and things like that. You could say they should upgrade, and maybe they should, but it has to be their choice, not Intel's.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by eydee View Post

        It's not about AMD. Many people don't buy new hardware every day. There are people out there with Core2Duos and things like that. You could say they should upgrade, and maybe they should, but it has to be their choice, not Intel's.
        Yep, C2D user here. The machine is going on 8 years, and I have absolutely no reason to upgrade. It still is powerful enough for common tasks and development.

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        • #14
          I''ve got a suspicion AMD's major CPU design teams are hootin' and hollerin' and yeehawin' loud as fuck right now. I bet you they feel totally vindicated in their frontend design.

          EDIT: After a lot of reading, I'm convinced This problem only exists because Intel allowed their engineers to cheat with the frontend a bit. Intel CPU's don't have device drivers, they have frontends. Intel can't do what nVidia does with its device drivers so they fudge the CPU's frontend instead. And that's why I say AMD must feel totally vindicated. While we might be just learning about these tricks, Intel must have been using these tricks in their microcode for performance optimizations from the very beginning. That's probably why these vulnerabilities look a lot like they were designed features and not bugs at all.
          Last edited by duby229; 01-08-2018, 04:24 AM.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by eydee View Post

            It's not about AMD. Many people don't buy new hardware every day. There are people out there with Core2Duos and things like that. You could say they should upgrade, and maybe they should, but it has to be their choice, not Intel's.
            All things considering there is an usual unofficial recommendation that after up to about 6 years people should upgrade their hardware, of course that is just recommendation no one forcing you to upgrade, but some software will sooner or later
            Last edited by dungeon; 01-08-2018, 04:27 AM.

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            • #16
              It is a conspiracy.

              A conspiracy by Intel, to make their CPUs appear better than they actually are.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Spooktra View Post
                ... The fault needs to be laid squarely at the feet of the various hardware vendors, namely Intel, AMD, ...
                ???
                Did you realize AMD CPUs are not affected by Meltdown?
                There is no slowdown on AMD CPUs.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by unixfan2001 View Post
                  It is a conspiracy.

                  A conspiracy by Intel, to make their CPUs appear better than they actually are.
                  Rather than conspiracy just shoddy business practice.. Sacrifice security for performance. And later, sacrifice security in order to stay ahead of a competitor.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by gururise View Post
                    The real slowdown comes after applying the Intel KPTI OS patch and the new Intel Microcode that goes along with it which makes the branch predictor in Intel CPU's significantly less aggressive. Techspot shows that the combination of the two has a more significant impact on system performance (gaming included): https://www.techspot.com/article/1556-meltdown-and-spectre-cpu-performance-windows/

                    Michael, the new Intel microcode should be available from Asus for their 370 MB as a BIOS update.
                    hot damn, that's a large hit.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Spooktra View Post
                      You didn't put too much thought in your response, did you? Has the government revealed everything they know about the Kennedy assassination? Ever hear of FISA courts, secret warrants, national security letters, gag orders, etc?

                      All they would need to do is issue a directive to Intel, who owns the rights to the x86 ISA that says all cpu's must have a secret back door that is undocumented and have Intel codify in their design policies that all processors have to be designed with the following "features" without disclosing to their engineers why they insist on using said designs.

                      For proof look at OpenBSD:

                      https://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/1...ackdoor_claim/

                      http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/...rs-may-be-true

                      The backdoors existed for a decade until the NDA expired and the author of the backdoors revealed their existence.

                      Why do you think the Chinese have decided to use Chinese developed RISC-V based processors for their new supercomputers?

                      This all stinks to high heaven of a conspiracy.
                      No need to attack me. I'm not saying it's impossible to keep a secret. I'm saying it's impossible if there are many people involved over a large period of time.

                      You need way less people to kill someone than to develop a CPU. That's my point here. After the assassination you can just burn every paper trail and never talk about it again for example. If you're lucky you don't get caught. But the design of a CPU is worked on constantly by hundreds of engineers. It's waaaay harder to hide something malicious here on purpose. Especially for 25 years.

                      Your articles also help my claim. If you heard or read about, it's not a secret anymore. And this came out 10 years (which is not even half of 25 years) after the alleged incident.
                      Plus this quote from the article you linked:
                      So, it appears the original allegations that developers working on OpenBSD networking code could have worked on backdoors but there is no proof and had opportunity to add them to OpenBSD but they probably didn't. And if they did, it was probably pulled out long ago anyway. The bugs previously mentioned were not found to backdoor code.
                      No proof and probably didn't happen.

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