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Microsoft Rolls Out .NET Core RC2, .NET Core SDK Preview 1 With Linux Support

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  • #11
    I'm curious whether and when mono would add support for Wayland and primary clipboard. FWIW, I reported the primary selection bug more than ½ year ago, still no news.

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    • #12
      .NET Core Tools Telemetry
      And that's why people want to rush into dismissing anything-Microsoft... .NET is cool but come on Microsoft..

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      • #13
        We need an Azure SDK for the Linux .Net API!

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        • #14
          Originally posted by meekteef View Post

          What's neat about it? It's just another development platform to add to the dozens of very good open source platforms on Linux.
          These are the usual claqueurs. You can observe them in every M$ thread here. Often they stay silent on all other non-M$-related topics...

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          • #15
            Originally posted by meekteef View Post

            What's neat about it? It's just another development platform to add to the dozens of very good open source platforms on Linux.
            How many of those development platforms allow development across Linux, Mac and Windows with very little code garbling and potentially without even recompilation (depending on your hosting model)? Yet has near-native performance. I would mention that C# alone is quite compelling, but there's a potential holy-war on which language is better (Certainly nothing from Microsoft!).

            Originally posted by theghost View Post

            These are the usual claqueurs. You can observe them in every M$ thread here. Often they stay silent on all other non-M$-related topics...
            Forgive me, but I'm far more interested in cross-platform development than anything specific to a single platform - including "just" Linux.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Kushan View Post

              How many of those development platforms allow development across Linux, Mac and Windows with very little code garbling and potentially without even recompilation (depending on your hosting model)? Yet has near-native performance.
              I don't think you can get that with anything other than Java. It's 100% cross-platform, while lot of dotnet's APIs are still closed. You just can't get your .net desktop application or game to run on that platforms while using the standard, supported technologies for that tasks.

              I know a lot of people on here dismiss anything Oracle just because it's Oracle, but this stuff is seriously neat and you'd be doing yourself a disservice by not taking a look at it.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by corzo View Post

                I don't think you can get that with anything other than Java. It's 100% cross-platform, while lot of dotnet's APIs are still closed. You just can't get your .net desktop application or game to run on that platforms while using the standard, supported technologies for that tasks.

                I know a lot of people on here dismiss anything Oracle just because it's Oracle, but this stuff is seriously neat and you'd be doing yourself a disservice by not taking a look at it.
                Java may be fast and have similar cross platform characteristics to C# but it's a very nasty memory hog, unlike .NET, and also lacks much of the tooling and special features like LINQ, and async/await that make C# nice to work with, and said tooling is about to get a lot better with Roslyn being realized in IDEs for much the same reason that CLang based IDEs are better than ctags based IDEs.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by corzo View Post

                  I don't think you can get that with anything other than Java. It's 100% cross-platform, while lot of dotnet's APIs are still closed. You just can't get your .net desktop application or game to run on that platforms while using the standard, supported technologies for that tasks.

                  I know a lot of people on here dismiss anything Oracle just because it's Oracle, but this stuff is seriously neat and you'd be doing yourself a disservice by not taking a look at it.

                  This is .NET Core. This is not the .NET of yore that you know and hate. All the APIs in .NET Core are open and cross platform.

                  There's no application model for Desktop applications yet (just console at the moment) but they will come.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post

                    ...and said tooling is about to get a lot better with Roslyn being realized in IDEs for much the same reason that...
                    Originally posted by jayrulez

                    There's no application model for Desktop applications yet (just console at the moment) but they will come.
                    I love this. Dot net is "about to get", "will come"... However Java is for some people the same Java we had in 1995, when it meant applets and there was no jit. And of course it can't get improved. It will just sit and wait.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Kushan View Post

                      How many of those development platforms allow development across Linux, Mac and Windows with very little code garbling and potentially without even recompilation (depending on your hosting model)? Yet has near-native performance. I would mention that C# alone is quite compelling, but there's a potential holy-war on which language is better (Certainly nothing from Microsoft!).



                      Forgive me, but I'm far more interested in cross-platform development than anything specific to a single platform - including "just" Linux.
                      In my experience, once you put together a reasonable sized application using the beneficial features of C#, rather than just copying over some basic C code for a benchmark, the performance becomes absolutely appalling, not 'near native'.

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