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DragonFlyBSD's Intel DRM/KMS Driver Now On Par With Linux 4.3

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  • DragonFlyBSD's Intel DRM/KMS Driver Now On Par With Linux 4.3

    Phoronix: DragonFlyBSD's Intel DRM/KMS Driver Now On Par With Linux 4.3

    While the FreeBSD's Intel kernel DRM/KMS driver is still dating back to the Linux 3.x kernel days and the state of other BSD distributions vary when it comes to their DRM/KMS support, DragonFlyBSD continues moving forward with their DRM/KMS driver porting from the Linux kernel. Their i915 DRM driver now is based off the relatively recent Linux 4.3 kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...i915-Linux-4.3

  • #2
    dfly also has better BayTrail support than linux. They patched both the cpu cstate and i965 driver with the working voltages and timings as opposed to linux dragging the broken code in mainline for the past 2 years.

    Any word on the UEFI installer? Once that's done I'm jumping ship from Debian Stable before Stretch releases.

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    • #3
      Whats the point of supporting baytrail. Intel is quitting atoms?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post
        Whats the point of supporting baytrail. Intel is quitting atoms?
        Wrong question.

        The important question is, what about Sata, wifi, usb 3.0, and so on? I thought BSDs were a crapshoot for things like that.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post
          Whats the point of supporting baytrail. Intel is quitting atoms?

          So the people with existing Bay Trail systems should just be left in the cold because Intel isn't going to continue with future Atom versions? That's a very odd point of view. Current Bay Trail systems don't magically cease to exist just because Intel doesn't want to iterate in that line any more.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            Wrong question.

            The important question is, what about Sata, wifi, usb 3.0, and so on? I thought BSDs were a crapshoot for things like that.

            Since when? I run OpenBSD on a laptop with all of the above, fully supported, and OpenBSD is usually the last BSD to get support for a particular type of hardware. OpenBSD has great wireless support, SATA has worked for over a decade, and it got USB 3.0 support nearly two years ago:

            http://www.osnews.com/story/28058/Op...B_3_0_support/

            OpenBSD in particular has performance issues related to scheduling and SMP, so it's not the best choice for a daily driver workstation (unless you're a developer dogfooding for the project), but it's great for embedded and server projects, as well as netbooks that are going to be slow no matter what OS you run. It's not lacking in hardware support as long as the hardware in question has open source drivers. FreeBSD is even better for hardware support, and NetBSD can run on pretty much anything with a CPU.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post
              ... Intel is quitting atoms ...
              ???
              Official source?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kaidenshi View Post
                FreeBSD is even better for hardware support
                Better than what?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by drSeehas View Post
                  ???
                  Official source?
                  Broxton (successor to Bay Trail and Cherry Trail) was canceled. Whether Intel will stop using the Atom name entirely remains to be seen.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DanL View Post
                    Broxton (successor to Bay Trail and Cherry Trail) was canceled. Whether Intel will stop using the Atom name entirely remains to be seen.
                    Broxton was meant for Smartphones.
                    What about Apollo Lake with Goldmont cores and Skylake graphics for low-cost entry PCs?
                    http://www.anandtech.com/show/10256/...-14nm-goldmont
                    Even Bay Trail is still in production.

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