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Debian GNU/kFreeBSD Gets Ready For FreeBSD 9.0

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  • curaga
    replied
    And that's a good thing. (kfreebsd or no default systemd, interpret as you wish)

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
    Where's your sources for the 7 years for Debian to adopt systemd when it's already in Debian testing and the initial release of systemd was only a year ago?
    If they won't drop kfreebsd then they won't be able to switch to systemd. I'm talking about making it default. I think Yogi_berra means the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sidicas
    replied
    Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
    From the 6 minute boot time. Oh and give yourself a pat on the back for not reading what I said, it was clear that I was not talking about Debian's boot time.
    Give yourself a pat on the back for pulling numbers out of your rear and not citing any sources... Where's your sources for the 7 years for Debian to adopt systemd when it's already in Debian testing and the initial release of systemd was only a year ago? ...and where's your sources for this mythical 6 minute boot time problem?

    I try not to feed the trolls, but claims like that need to be backed up, or they keep getting exaggerated and can damage the reputation of FOSS in general...

    Leave a comment:


  • yogi_berra
    replied
    Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
    Where do you get 6 minute boot time from?
    From the 6 minute boot time. Oh and give yourself a pat on the back for not reading what I said, it was clear that I was not talking about Debian's boot time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Goderic
    replied
    Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
    I'm still trying to figure out why people are even running FreeBSD any more...

    I mean, having a Debian GNU/HURD I could understand.. But it seems to me that offering another monolithic kernel written in C as an alternative to a monolithic kernel written in C seems a bit redundant.
    Why? There are like tens of million things that have tons of very similar alternatives, and yet they live (happily) next to each other. Why would it be a problem for a kernel/OS?


    More practical answer: ZFS, Dtrace, preferring BSD license over GPL, ...

    Leave a comment:


  • kraftman
    replied
    Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
    7 years? It's already in Debian testing and will be in Debian stable at the end of 2012... Where do you get 7 years from?
    If Debian won't stop trying to be multi OS then I doubt if it will be possible for them to switch to systemd.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sidicas
    replied
    Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
    Yep, 7 years. It took Debian 7 years to be able to install a 32 bit application in a 64 bit environment,
    Why would you install a 32-bit application in a 64-bit environment? Just recompile it to be 64-bit... I've never hear of it taking 7 years to be able to install 32-bit apps in a 64-bit environment, you just install the ia32-libs and you should have everything.. ia32-libs has been there in the 64-bit environment for ages..

    Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
    why wouldn't it take them 7 years to re-invent the wheel that was re-invented by Red Hat to solve their 6 minute boot time?
    Where do you get 6 minute boot time from? A typical Debian install is a lot leaner than the overwhelming majority of other distros out there. My 5 year old single-core 2.0 Ghz Pentium-M Laptop boots in <1 minute to a KDE desktop with Amarok and a web browser opened at startup not to mention the animated GRUB boot splash....and it's got a 5400RPM hard drive.
    Last edited by Sidicas; 10 December 2011, 12:31 AM.

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  • yogi_berra
    replied
    Originally posted by Sidicas View Post
    7 years? It's already in Debian testing and will be in Debian stable at the end of 2012... Where do you get 7 years from?
    Yep, 7 years. It took Debian 7 years to be able to install a 32 bit application in a 64 bit environment, why wouldn't it take them 7 years to re-invent the wheel that was re-invented by Red Hat to solve their 6 minute boot time?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sidicas
    replied
    Originally posted by yogi_berra View Post
    That's alright, Debian will reinvent systemd in 7 years and act like it is new.
    7 years? It's already in Debian testing and will be in Debian stable at the end of 2012... Where do you get 7 years from?

    Leave a comment:


  • yogi_berra
    replied
    Originally posted by kraftman View Post
    Some may loose their motivation when everyone will use systemd except Debian.
    That's alright, Debian will reinvent systemd in 7 years and act like it is new.

    Leave a comment:

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