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FreeBSD 14.1 vs. FreeBSD 14.0 Benchmarks On AMD Ryzen Threadripper

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  • FreeBSD 14.1 vs. FreeBSD 14.0 Benchmarks On AMD Ryzen Threadripper

    Phoronix: FreeBSD 14.1 vs. FreeBSD 14.0 Benchmarks On AMD Ryzen Threadripper

    Debuting last week was FreeBSD 14.1 with performance improvements and more. Given there being some performance optimizations and other upgrades like a more recent LLVM Clang compiler by default, I've begun running some benchmarks of this newest FreeBSD stable release. In today's article is a quick comparison of FreeBSD 14.1 vs. FreeBSD 14.0 performance using an AMD Ryzen Threadripper 7980X 64-core processor within the System76 Thelio Major workstation.

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Looking forward to seeing Linux vs FreeBSD being benchmarked again

    Comment


    • #3
      The System76 people should pay close attention to this article.

      If they want to market an computer system for AI, scientific and similar tasks, and they want to offer an open source OS, then they should go full bore and offer a true Unix system, not a clone.

      It's also kind of funny that the wireless networking worked just fine but not the wired, usually it's the other way around.

      What I would if I was them would be to modify the website and offer the following:

      1) Their usual PoP_OS based system configuration

      2) The same hardware but with something like MidnightBSD pre-installed

      3) The same hardware but with Windows 11 Pro pre-installed

      They don't have to actually have these built ahead of time, just put the options, market them all as AI and scientific workload focused and see which one gets more hits.

      If you find that for every PoP_OS order you get 2 BSD and 3 Windows orders, then you can make a decision as a company if you want to pursue growth and market share or you want to stick to a specific ideology.

      I think both a Windows and a Unix based offering would probably outsell a Linux based offering by a significant margin.
      Last edited by sophisticles; 12 June 2024, 12:56 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Would like to see on network related benchmarks.
        OPNSense 24.1 vs 24.7, being 13.2 (I think) vs 14.1 with all the new perf optimizations.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
          The System76 people should pay close attention to this article. blah blah blah
          This troll is still trolling here?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Volta View Post

            This troll is still trolling here?
            “Worse hardware support and software compatibility? Linux better watch out! These things would sell like hotcakes!!”

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dumdumjobes View Post

              “Worse hardware support and software compatibility? Linux better watch out! These things would sell like hotcakes!!”
              Yes, and I'm not sure why he thinks "true Unix" is an advantage? A few years ago, Linux buried the so-called "true Unix" known as slowlaris.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Volta View Post

                Yes, and I'm not sure why he thinks "true Unix" is an advantage?
                Yes, what is 'true unix'? At least FBSD people define their software by "no systemd" and by "tightly integrated kernel and userland". The former may be an advantage for some (but there are systemd-less linux distros as well), and the latter is just meaningless bullshit.

                The UNIX idea evolved into Linux. Not directly ofc but the way how linux is working. The concept behind linux is still more or less the same. And linux is also evolving into something new, that's for sure (with systemd, leaving X11 behind, with the improved support of HW, etc).

                The only advantage of late unixes was that they were developed by corporates for their own hardware (solaris, aix, etc). Those HWs are long gone. And they were terrible expensive. It was vendor lock-in.

                So I'm also curious what "true unix advantage" means.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by User29 View Post
                  So I'm also curious what "true unix advantage" means.
                  True security for one.

                  OpenBSD has only ever had one vulnerability, one.

                  Do you know how many open security vulnerabilities Linux currently has?

                  Close to 500.

                  There is a hacking competition known as Pwn2Own​, a few years ago Win 7 went up against Ubuntu; Windows was rooted in 30 seconds, Ubuntu took 3 times as long. 90 seconds.

                  In the most recent competition Ubuntu was hacked 3 times:

                  On the first day of Pwn2Own Vancouver 2024, contestants demoed 19 zero-day vulnerabilities in Windows 11, Tesla, Ubuntu Linux and other devices and software to win $732,500 and a Tesla Model 3 car.


                  Linux security is a joke, a scam perpetrated on the gullible,

                  If you're going to sell a system featuring *nix, then at least use a real Unix, something that is not a toy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
                    If you're going to sell a system featuring *nix, then at least use a real Unix, something that is not a toy.
                    So AIX, macOS or HP-UX. Those are the last remaining certified UNIX 03 systems. The rest are Unix-like.

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