Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

FreeBSD Continues Push Toward Deprecating 32-bit Platforms

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • zamroni111
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    Every distro should make one last 32bit LTS release and then just drop it. In 6 years or so when it becomes EOL there is certainly no need to still use such processors in production. And hobbyist projects can then support them as long as the kernel supports it.
    the last 32-bit-only intel was netburst series which was end of sale in 2010.
    even if the hardware still alive, i dont think it was still used as daily primary computer by 2020 and moreover installed with latest ubuntu

    Leave a comment:


  • Estranged1906
    replied
    Not my problem, I'll just keep using my modern IA64 machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • rene
    replied
    Soon this T2 Linux will be the last to support 32-bit platforms, ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBlc8tNSGRk

    Leave a comment:


  • endrebjorsvik
    replied
    Originally posted by ayumu View Post
    Yup. And just recently they made a lot of our older (but still in use) hardware much less useful, by removing PCMCIA support.
    I completely agree with kernel maintainers that PCMCIA hardware is obsolete today. PCMCIA was succeeded by ExpressCard in 2003. Around that time we also saw a significant improvement in CPU efficiency. The horribly inefficient Pentium 4 was replaced by the vastly improved Pentium M/Dothan/Core/Yonah family of CPUs. Dothan was released in 2003 and Yonah in 2006. I consider anything prior to those CPU families completely obsolete. They are burning lots of power with very little performance. The Pentium M was not a huge commercial success, so there are mainly Core CPUs left from that era. Given that those were launched in 2006, I firmly believe that most of them shipped with ExpressCard instead of PCMCIA.

    There might be a few odd ones out there with Core and PCMCIA, but I do not believe that it is worth spending precious kernel development time on those. You still have the possibility of running older kernels on that hardware. Especially LTS stuff like RHEL 8, which is supported until 2029.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by ayumu View Post

    Yup. And just recently they made a lot of our older (but still in use) hardware much less useful, by removing PCMCIA support.
    The hardware is now 15-35 years old. It will still take years before you start considering upgrading to distros that don't have any 32-bit support. It will still be possible to upgrade the userspace apps separately. The new kernels typically don't provide any new features for 15+ year old hardware.

    Leave a comment:


  • User29
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    Every distro should make one last 32bit LTS release
    Playing with other people's money and time.... Should could would....

    Leave a comment:


  • Setif
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    Every distro should make one last 32bit LTS release and then just drop it. In 6 years or so when it becomes EOL there is certainly no need to still use such processors in production.
    Will you pay them from your pocket?, Or Is it part of an agreement /contract we don't know about?
    No one could dictate on someone who's offering something for free when could he stop offering it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ayumu
    replied
    Originally posted by jaypatelani View Post

    Ironically Linux has been backbone to serve most corpos. RedHat to Google.
    Yup. And just recently they made a lot of our older (but still in use) hardware much less useful, by removing PCMCIA support.

    Leave a comment:


  • jaypatelani
    replied
    Originally posted by ayumu View Post
    Corporate priorities. For a while now, Freebsd only exists to serve corpos.
    Ironically Linux has been backbone to serve most corpos. RedHat to Google.

    Leave a comment:


  • ayumu
    replied
    Corporate priorities. For a while now, Freebsd only exists to serve corpos.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X