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Haiku Had A Very Busy March Improving Hardware Support & More

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Nozo View Post
    Fuchsia is not going to replace Linux, actually is going to replace BSD because they share similar licenses
    Fuchsia was meant to replace Android. Still hasn't. It's just a skunkworks project.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Volta View Post

      All of the Steam Decks sold. More to come. Linux has the highest number of playable games next to Windows. Linux started conquering the desktop much later than macOS and it's not too far behind. Linux recently started fixing its the biggest downside on desktop: X. Windows is on Solaris path to the end while Linux future is very bright. The only one who's hopless here is 'I have no clue - ayumu'. The fight just started and Linux is on much better position than anything. Haiku is maybe twenty years behind..
      Linux Desktop is like "Communism in Soviet Union". Preached to arrive soon but never arrives. "Haphazard re-invention of the wheel" fucks it up. People want stable desktop, not something where you have to account for x times n issues - which mostly works but once you have figured it out - might radically change some aspect of design in next version. Worse than Windows that way.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by aht0 View Post

        Linux Desktop is like "Communism in Soviet Union". Preached to arrive soon but never arrives. "Haphazard re-invention of the wheel" fucks it up. People want stable desktop, not something where you have to account for x times n issues - which mostly works but once you have figured it out - might radically change some aspect of design in next version. Worse than Windows that way.
        Every operating system is like that, including Windows. They've changed their Photos app, video editing app, video/audio playback apps (going back to "Windows Media Player" again), the Start menu/screen, etc., in every major version of Windows for as long as I can remember. They've also changed the availability of Visio and Project, making them mostly just web apps now, plus cancelled a whole bunch of projects and products. So has Google for that matter. Chrome OS keeps changing, and users aren't told about new upcoming changes in advance. They just get them automatically every 4-6 weeks.

        Apple seems to put less emphasis on changing features majorly in new OS versions, but they do cancel products and sometimes features. The most recent that comes to mind would be the iPod touch and macOS Server. Shame about both - the iPod touch was a great cheap option for kids whom you might not want to have a phone, but I can see the allure of giving everyone in the family a phone (great for Apple's business and sales numbers), and macOS Server was a great product in its heyday when they had the simple email server and web server setup options in it. The last few versions relegated it to merely an MDM platform for Apple devices, but they've moved that to a cloud service instead. Stands to reason that they put more into cloud/iCloud integration because it's more profitable to get recurring revenue streams, but this eliminates all on-site IT service management options from Apple as a first-party vendor. Similarly, Microsoft killed off their Small Business and Essentials server product lines in favour of much more expensive cloud options (Microsoft 365 and Azure).

        This is the state of IT today. Few options available from first-party vendors without getting it hosted. Thankfully, NAS companies have beefed up their game and have a wide array of IT infrastructure services available as easy-to-install on-site packages for their hardware. And you get what you pay for, as far as simplicity goes. Much of it is open-source, but the UX of open-source options available for free don't have the simplicity of a graphical mouse-driven console view of a service that you'd find in a commercial product. For instance, I can install and configure a recursive, caching DNS server on a Synology NAS with about 5 clicks of the mouse. In a typical free Linux environment, I'd have to know all of the commands necessary to do that, plus configure it manually via configuration file. You can't tell me that a command line interface is easier. NAS vendors have essentially taken over where on-site server products like Apple's and Microsoft's used to accomodate. And it's built from open-source, but with a commercialized management UX. Apple's macOS Server used to be exactly like this. But who's seen iCloud source code lately?

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Waethorn View Post

          Fuchsia was meant to replace Android. Still hasn't. It's just a skunkworks project.
          They had ported the android runtime like a couple years ago already.

          My take is that they've been ready for a while already, and it'll happen overnight, once the decision is made.

          But I suspect that, no matter how long they wait, there will still be some friction when put to real world use.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by ayumu View Post

            They had ported the android runtime like a couple years ago already.

            My take is that they've been ready for a while already, and it'll happen overnight, once the decision is made.

            But I suspect that, no matter how long they wait, there will still be some friction when put to real world use.
            It'll replace Android when Samsung replaces Android with Tizen.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Waethorn View Post

              It'll replace Android when Samsung replaces Android with Tizen.
              Google can pull the plug at any time. They can also release an Android 15 or whatever that's actually fuchsia. The user would be nonethewiser.

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