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FreeBSD Shortening Its Boot Time, ASLR By Default & Better Intel WiFi Support

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  • #21
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    I was surprised at those results. While not much different, I expected lz4 to be one of the better performers.
    AFAIR lz4 is optimized for compression speed, not size or decompression speed. Size may not seem at all relevant, but it does mean you have a smaller input to your decompressor and less data to read from disk.
    I'm certainly surprised cat beat any of the compressed versions, precisely for the data size argument.

    I never had a kernel+initramfs take that long on non-behemoth initramfs, even on rotating disks. My netbook currently does the kernel stage in about 1.5". Are you telling mkinitcpio to only pick modules you use and all that? How big is the initramfs?

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    • #22
      Originally posted by sinepgib View Post

      AFAIR lz4 is optimized for compression speed, not size or decompression speed. Size may not seem at all relevant, but it does mean you have a smaller input to your decompressor and less data to read from disk.
      I'm certainly surprised cat beat any of the compressed versions, precisely for the data size argument.

      I never had a kernel+initramfs take that long on non-behemoth initramfs, even on rotating disks. My netbook currently does the kernel stage in about 1.5". Are you telling mkinitcpio to only pick modules you use and all that? How big is the initramfs?
      AFAIK LZ4 is used when you want speed for both. LZ4HC is where you sacrifice compression speed for more data compression, but both have high speed decompression (which Zstd inherited since it's based on LZ4 and by the same author).

      LZ4 is the goto codec on ZFS when you want compression but don't want to be bottle-necked during codec operations. You usually need very high speed disks (expensive NVMe) to outperform LZ4 in compression or decompression.

      My kernels are between 9-10MB and the initramfs between 21-22MB (Dolphin) and they only contain a minimal amount of modules. That's the uncompressed size. Give me a while and I'll get around to compressing them and see what I get.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

        LZ4 is the goto codec on ZFS when you want compression but don't want to be bottle-necked during codec operations. You usually need very high speed disks (expensive NVMe) to outperform LZ4 in compression or decompression.
        I'd need to check because my memory is not as good as it used to, I know I'm using either lz4 or zstd in my old Atom laptop (with a regular SSD to saturate its SATA bus), I tried and timed all of the codecs recent kernels support and picked the fastest one. I think it was zstd, but you may be right. Of course, this is an anecdotal note only.

        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

        My kernels are between 9-10MB and the initramfs between 21-22MB (Dolphin) and they only contain a minimal amount of modules. That's the uncompressed size. Give me a while and I'll get around to compressing them and see what I get.
        Mine are both kernel and initramfs about 7MiB, but the one computer I paid the most attention to wrt boot is the netbook and that's 32 bits, so maybe the smaller kernel is due to that. The initramfs I doubt, being about a third the size is not likely based on that alone. If you remind me tomorrow I can share the exact numbers and my config if you want.

        I can't right now because I'm using my employer's Mac to post this.

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        • #24
          Still no Intel 802.11n support, let alone AC or AX.

          Rough.

          At least N on OpenBSD gets things by for now.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Ranguvar View Post
            Still no Intel 802.11n support,
            ???

            https://wiki.freebsd.org/WiFi/80211n

            Some of the wireless drivers support 802.11n. The following is an incomplete list.
            • iwn (Intel) NICs - 4965, perhaps others; STA mode only
            • ath 11n series NICs (AR5416, AR9130, AR9160, AR9280, AR9285, AR9287, AR94xx, AR95xx) - STA/AP mode, TX and RX aggregation
            • mwl NICs (88W8363 802.11n NIC)
            • rsu (RTL8188SU / RTL81892SU)
            • urtwn (RTL8188CU / RTL8188RU / RTL8188EU / RTL8192CU)

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            • #26
              Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
              Anyone know if the ASLR and boot time improvements are coming to 13.1 or if we have to wait years for 14.0 to come out?
              Both with 14. 14 is next year.
              Last edited by brad0; 13 March 2022, 12:07 AM.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by brad0 View Post

                Both with 14. 14 is next year.
                Thank you, feels like a forever wait for 14 though with it not coming out till 2023.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Ranguvar View Post
                  Still no Intel 802.11n support, let alone AC or AX.

                  Rough.

                  At least N on OpenBSD gets things by for now.
                  -current has initial AC support.

                  https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=164727045605542&w=2
                  https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=164727054105578&w=2

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                  • #29
                    Starting out with the Intel Wifi 6 adapters and now the Wifi 5 adapters..

                    https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-cvs&m=164768562118583&w=2
                    Last edited by brad0; 19 March 2022, 05:57 PM.

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