Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

An Early Look At Windows 11 WSL2 Performance Against Ubuntu Linux

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • An Early Look At Windows 11 WSL2 Performance Against Ubuntu Linux

    Phoronix: An Early Look At Windows 11 WSL2 Performance Against Ubuntu Linux

    For those making use of Microsoft's Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL2) for enjoying Linux application support within Windows, here are some early benchmarks of the inaugural Windows Insider Preview build of Windows 11 with WSL2 against Windows 10 and then Ubuntu Linux bare metal on the same hardware.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30312

  • #2
    What I'm mostly interested in is the io performance when accessing the Windows filesystem in WSL2 on Windows 10 vs 11. That has been the biggest problem with WSL2 so far, really crappy io performance in /mnt/c. Hoping it will be better in Windows 11.

    Comment


    • #3
      Considering this is a sort of virtualization, WSL2 has a really decent performance. Filesystem performance in terms of dealing with small files is lower but that's always been the case probably because of the way ACL is implemented in Windows.

      Comment


      • #4
        "Early" being the key word, it took about a week till Hyper-V stopped working with no obvious way to ressurect it (disabling and reenabling components, sfc, dism, ...) and since thats the backend used, WSL2 also stops working. Still improvement over build 21390 where it didnt work from the beginning.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by avem View Post
          Considering this is a sort of virtualization, WSL2 has a really decent performance. Filesystem performance in terms of dealing with small files is lower but that's always been the case probably because of the way ACL is implemented in Windows.
          I think you're right. Try the same using plan9 or virtiofs on Linux. There's is a lot of overhead.

          Comment


          • #6
            SecureMark

            How is WSL faster than bare-metal! This makes no sense unless Microsoft is paying Canonical to make Ubuntu slower on purpo-

            .....

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by avem View Post
              Considering this is a sort of virtualization, WSL2 has a really decent performance. Filesystem performance in terms of dealing with small files is lower but that's always been the case probably because of the way ACL is implemented in Windows.
              I know that Windows Defender has a huge negative impact on performance because it scans files on write. Compilation is especially affected. With MSYS I recently saw a 7x speed increase just by disabling that.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bearoso View Post
                I know that Windows Defender has a huge negative impact on performance because it scans files on write. Compilation is especially affected. With MSYS I recently saw a 7x speed increase just by disabling that.
                Interesting. I wonder how performance will fare once WSL2's path is excluded in Defender.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tuxie View Post
                  What I'm mostly interested in is the io performance when accessing the Windows filesystem in WSL2 on Windows 10 vs 11. That has been the biggest problem with WSL2 so far, really crappy io performance in /mnt/c. Hoping it will be better in Windows 11.
                  That is one of the specific use cases that WSL1 is recommended for, and is the reason I use WSL1.

                  https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...her-than-wsl-2

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                    SecureMark

                    How is WSL faster than bare-metal! This makes no sense unless Microsoft is paying Canonical to make Ubuntu slower on purpo-

                    .....
                    I think this is complicated. I looked up test description, and it says it measures performance, energy and power. I am not sure how it works, but I can imagine some component on the platform benchmarked drawing more power on Ubuntu but not on WIndows, resulting in worse results for Ubuntu in that test.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X