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Haiku R1 Beta 3 Aims For Release In About One Month

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  • Haiku R1 Beta 3 Aims For Release In About One Month

    Phoronix: Haiku R1 Beta 3 Aims For Release In About One Month

    The Haiku open-source operating system inspired by BeOS has been in development since 2001. It took until September 2018 for the Haiku R1 Beta and then last summer was succeeded by Haiku R1 Beta 2. Now a year later the third beta for this inaugural release is now approaching...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...3-Release-Plan

  • #2
    I've been playing w/ Haiku on a VM from time to time since 2017ish and Haiku is showing great improvement between each release.
    That said, both WebPositive and Otter, while greatly improved, are still miles behind Chrome and Firefox and the lack of accelerated graphics is problematic when trying to play above-HD video or complex graphics.

    In short, I suggest you give it a try on a VM or an old PC. It's worth the hassle.

    FWIW, My Vm currently is tracking the latest releases (nightly).
    Devel: Intel S2600C0, 2xE5-2658V2, 32GB, 6x2TB, 1x256GB-SSD, GTX1080, F33, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
    oVirt: Intel S2400GP2, 2xE5-2448L, 96GB, 10x2TB, GTX550, CentOS8.3.
    Win10: Gigabyte B85M-HD3, E3-1245V3, 32GB, 5x1TB, GTX980, Win10Pro.
    Devel-2: Asus H110M-K, i5-6500, 16GB, 3x1TB + 128GB-SSD, F33, Dell U2711.
    Laptop: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F33.

    Comment


    • #3
      Does Haiku have any benefits over Windows or Linux?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        Does Haiku have any benefits over Windows or Linux?
        Greatly depends on who you are asking.
        In general, Haiku has the potential to be a very clean and uniform desktop OS.
        Its ***fast***. Even when running on my private oVirt servers (along with ~40 other VMs...) + VESA graphics (Not even 2D acceleration), it is considerably faster than Linux.
        The UI is clean and well designed. Native applications look uniform.
        On the other hand, hardware support is nowhere near modern Linux (it's on par with Linux from the ~99-2003'ish) and it lacks modern multi-user support.

        I'll put this way, I don't see myself replacing Linux as my daily driver (both @home and @work).
        But I do see myself installing on an old laptop or desktop and using it for fun.

        - Gilboa

        Devel: Intel S2600C0, 2xE5-2658V2, 32GB, 6x2TB, 1x256GB-SSD, GTX1080, F33, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
        oVirt: Intel S2400GP2, 2xE5-2448L, 96GB, 10x2TB, GTX550, CentOS8.3.
        Win10: Gigabyte B85M-HD3, E3-1245V3, 32GB, 5x1TB, GTX980, Win10Pro.
        Devel-2: Asus H110M-K, i5-6500, 16GB, 3x1TB + 128GB-SSD, F33, Dell U2711.
        Laptop: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F33.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gilboa View Post
          [...] the lack of accelerated graphics [...]
          While I keep an eye on all OS developments I hear of -and Haiku has been one of them-, however if I had to choose whether to put a CPU or a blitter in a new computer, I'd choose the later, so I really feel offside in OSs where the gfx is not the first citizen. My first UNIX was IRIX, so I think that explains it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by cesarcafe View Post
            I really feel offside in OSs where the gfx is not the first citizen.
            If you start your OS with the video driver you'll end up having graphics support for 20 year old chips by the time the OS is usable. And compared to pretty much everything else in a computer, graphics hardware changes the most, so it's really a poor investment.

            IRIX had it easier: hardware and software were built together and video chips were much simpler to implement _something_ for.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              Does Haiku have any benefits over Windows or Linux?
              I have been playing around with it on an old laptop, and I can actually say that it is promising. How fast it is is kind of variable at the moment since it doesn't have nearly as much things behind its graphical stack as Linux does, let alone Windows, but from what I see it is efficient.
              The desktop is cleanish, but I will be honest that really depends on how much you like a Tiling Windows manager. Personally speaking I'm not much of a fan.

              As far as web browsers go, it's neither here nor there. Last I checked they build on webkit and simply because of the amount of development that they have to do from scratch, it's a dated version of it. The likelihood of either Google or Mozilla (to be fair Mozilla did that a while back, but we are talking Firefox 2[?]... So it has been a while) resources on a build for that OS is unlikely.

              So far it's been interesting to toy around in, to what ends will it find popularity? I don't know.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by gilboa View Post
                I've been playing w/ Haiku on a VM from time to time since 2017ish and Haiku is showing great improvement between each release.
                That said, both WebPositive and Otter, while greatly improved, are still miles behind Chrome and Firefox and the lack of accelerated graphics is problematic when trying to play above-HD video or complex graphics.

                In short, I suggest you give it a try on a VM or an old PC. It's worth the hassle.

                FWIW, My Vm currently is tracking the latest releases (nightly).
                Not sure what you mean with regards to videos. I installed Haiku once again last week and 1080p on YouTube is no issue at all, at least in WebPositive.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gilboa View Post
                  Don't bother answering uid313. He asks the same question in almost every Haiku thread and receives answers every time. So if he doesn't know by now…

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Duve View Post

                    I have been playing around with it on an old laptop, and I can actually say that it is promising. How fast it is is kind of variable at the moment since it doesn't have nearly as much things behind its graphical stack as Linux does, let alone Windows, but from what I see it is efficient.
                    The desktop is cleanish, but I will be honest that really depends on how much you like a Tiling Windows manager. Personally speaking I'm not much of a fan.

                    As far as web browsers go, it's neither here nor there. Last I checked they build on webkit and simply because of the amount of development that they have to do from scratch, it's a dated version of it. The likelihood of either Google or Mozilla (to be fair Mozilla did that a while back, but we are talking Firefox 2[?]... So it has been a while) resources on a build for that OS is unlikely.

                    So far it's been interesting to toy around in, to what ends will it find popularity? I don't know.
                    WebKit itself is not old - Safari uses it and Apple works on it. But Haiku's build is older, you're right about that. However, Otter is available and uses QtWebEngine, which is based on Blink.

                    Also, what do you mean by “tiling WM”? Haiku is not a tiling WM. Tiling is what e.g. i3 does and Haiku's WM doesn't even come close to that metaphor. Every window can be freely floated around and can be resized by dragging from the edges with the right mouse button pressed (as opposed to the left mouse button on most other OS's).

                    Comment

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