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NetBSD Made Progress Thanks To GSoC In Its March Towards Steam Support

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  • NetBSD Made Progress Thanks To GSoC In Its March Towards Steam Support

    Phoronix: NetBSD Made Progress Thanks To GSoC In Its March Towards Steam Support

    Ultimately the goal is to get Valve's Steam client running on NetBSD using their Linux compatibility layer while the focus the past few months with Google Summer of Code 2019 were supporting the necessary DRM ioctls for allowing Linux software running on NetBSD to be able to tap accelerated graphics support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Ioctl-GSoC2019

  • #2
    And people acted like I was an arrtard when I suggested using BSD as a base for SteamOS

    Thanks, Surya P. Know that there is at least one person that's very excited about this.

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    • #3
      Wonderful works being done for NetBSD

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      • #4
        For graphics NetBSD is inferior to Linux, at best.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          For graphics NetBSD is inferior to Linux, at best.
          Well, yeah.

          Most BSDs have Mesa 18.something, AMD GPU drivers are around Linux 4.7 at best outside of some development branches, they have a fraction of the amount of developers, etc. Still, that combination was and is still used on some LTS Linux distributions so it's not like *BSD is that far behind.

          Progress is progress. More games becoming available on more operating systems is a good thing.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
            Still, that combination was and is still used on some LTS Linux distributions so it's not like *BSD is that far behind.
            For gaming, that's pretty far behind, regardless of how you spindoctor it.

            For context, Linux 4.7 is when we first had some kind of support for RX480.

            Progress is progress. More games becoming available on more operating systems is a good thing.
            More platforms running games like shit isn't an appreciable difference. Not even on Linux you get anything resembling a decent experience.

            I'm not stopping people from doing what they want of their free time, nor people from getting paid or learning stuff they can use to get a decent job with a GSoC.

            But I'm not praising this endeavor.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
              And people acted like I was an arrtard when I suggested using BSD as a base for SteamOS
              You can forget about this. It's hardly usable as desktop not to mention playing games on it. The lack of drivers and weak hardware support is too much I think.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jaypatelani View Post
                Wonderful works being done for NetBSD
                s for allowing Linux software running on NetBSD to be able to tap accelerated graphics support...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                  Well, yeah.

                  Most BSDs have Mesa 18.something, AMD GPU drivers are around Linux 4.7 at best outside of some development branches, they have a fraction of the amount of developers, etc. Still, that combination was and is still used on some LTS Linux distributions so it's not like *BSD is that far behind.

                  Progress is progress. More games becoming available on more operating systems is a good thing.
                  I don't think it is worth the effort to get Steam running. The way forward is to define win32 as the de facto API for games, so Wine becomes the standard runtime. This way, all compatible software will be preserved.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
                    I don't think it is worth the effort to get Steam running. The way forward is to define win32 as the de facto API for games, so Wine becomes the standard runtime. This way, all compatible software will be preserved.
                    there is more than win32 to let games run. Only plausible way is virtualization with some form of GPU passthrough.

                    Eventually when they decide that virtualized GPU isn't just a thing for workstations and every consumer GPU will allow it (Or even just AMD and Intel's, we all know how NVIDIA thinks) you can pull off a VM with the various OSes that games need.

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