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Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

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  • Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

    Phoronix: Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

    While it was not too long ago that Microsoft Windows Server 2019 began shipping and that we conducted some end-of-year benchmarks between Windows and Linux, with being in the process of running a number of Windows and Linux benchmarks as part of our ongoing 10GbE OS performance testing, I also took the opportunity to run some other benchmarks on Windows Server 2016 and 2019 as well as a set of Linux distributions.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=27443

  • #2
    Typo:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Strawberrrrrrrrrrrry Perl on Windows remains no substitute for Perl on the Linux distributions.

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    • #3
      Why does Linux so often perform so much better than Windows?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by louis_irl View Post
        Why does Linux so often perform so much better than Windows?
        I think at least part of the difference is that the Windows filesystem NTFS is terribly slow and inefficient compared to most of the commonly used Linux filesystems.

        That's definitely the speed difference in git. It may be the difference in other scenarios, maybe reading or writing files is the bottleneck.

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        • #5
          Why you didn't include FreeBSD or DragonflyBSD in benchmarks? There are six Linux distributions and no BSD at all. Don't discriminate BSD, please.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Michael_S View Post

            I think at least part of the difference is that the Windows filesystem NTFS is terribly slow and inefficient compared to most of the commonly used Linux filesystems.

            That's definitely the speed difference in git. It may be the difference in other scenarios, maybe reading or writing files is the bottleneck.
            I wouldn't say it's terribly slow or inefficient, just the NT kernel handles I/O completely different to Linux and Microsoft loves backwards compatibility (can't have those av products stop working now, can we).

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            • #7
              @Michael: Wanna bench Fedora Atomic/CoreOS?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by louis_irl View Post
                Why does Linux so often perform so much better than Windows?
                There was an interesting Hacker News comment from a Windows developer a few years ago that gave a reasonable explanation why: Microsoft developers are incentivized to create new features instead of improving existing ones. It looks much better for your annual review to say you created new feature X than to say you improved Y by 5%. On the other hand those types of small improvements are more than welcome by the Linux developers and over time they accrue to produce significant improvements.

                That comment was posted at the tail end of the Ballmer era of Microsoft so I hope that things have improved since then. A more recent comment on the WSL Github issue tracker does seem to indicate that there are still significant technical barriers to improving Windows even if the corporate-cultural ones are removed.

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                • #9
                  and you have to pay for it?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Britoid View Post
                    I wouldn't say it's terribly slow or inefficient, just the NT kernel handles I/O completely different to Linux and Microsoft loves backwards compatibility (can't have those av products stop working now, can we).
                    ms' implementation of ntfs is terribly slow and inefficient, no matter what excuse you can find

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