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DragonFlyBSD Continues Gutting Its i386 Code

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    rene
    Senior Member

  • rene
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    That's i386 hardware. The actual arch name is still in use, even if not really truly i386. https://github.com/torvalds/linux/bl...h/x86/Makefile

    i386 in the kernel arch and in this specific article actually means "32bit" processors https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...tem&px=MTg0Nzg so I'm using "i386" correctly to mean 32bit.
    As if I of all people would not know that. I only wanted to correct when you say"no shortage of maintainers for i386" while speaking of vintage hardware support when exactly that was already removed quite some time ago.

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  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post
    you should not write i386 when this was removed some years ago and it is i486 and newer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afwIZDtrRj4
    That's i386 hardware. The actual arch name is still in use, even if not really truly i386. https://github.com/torvalds/linux/bl...h/x86/Makefile

    i386 in the kernel arch and in this specific article actually means "32bit" processors https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...tem&px=MTg0Nzg so I'm using "i386" correctly to mean 32bit.

    Leave a comment:

  • rene
    Senior Member

  • rene
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    people with niche vintage devices are encouraged to maintain their own fork if they care so much about supporting hardware that is by all intents and purposes obsolete.

    On Linux for example there is no shortage of maintainers for i386 arch (in the kernel anyway), and there are distros for them. Mainly because actual networking and embedded stuff like Geode-based devices (PCEngines Alix boards or touch panels) are still usable for their intended purpose.
    you should not write i386 when this was removed some years ago and it is i486 and newer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afwIZDtrRj4

    Leave a comment:

  • starshipeleven
    Premium Supporter

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post
    not exactly amazing for people with nice vintage devices, such as the ultra portable Sony Vaio P: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suCj4eulTJg or Transmeta based OQO 01: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s22Rk1xW9ME
    people with niche vintage devices are encouraged to maintain their own fork if they care so much about supporting hardware that is by all intents and purposes obsolete.

    On Linux for example there is no shortage of maintainers for i386 arch (in the kernel anyway), and there are distros for them. Mainly because actual networking and embedded stuff like Geode-based devices (PCEngines Alix boards or touch panels) are still usable for their intended purpose.

    Leave a comment:

  • untore
    Phoronix Member

  • untore
    replied
    Originally posted by NateHubbard View Post

    You can always run vintage operating systems on vintage hardware. Probably best if you kept it off a network though, which shouldn't be an issue in the museum I assume you're curating.
    I think airgaps are not uncommon in museums.
    But isnt netbsd the goto BSD choice for small factor devices anyway ?

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  • NateHubbard
    Senior Member

  • NateHubbard
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post
    not exactly amazing for people with nice vintage devices, such as the ultra portable Sony Vaio P: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suCj4eulTJg or Transmeta based OQO 01: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s22Rk1xW9ME
    You can always run vintage operating systems on vintage hardware. Probably best if you kept it off a network though, which shouldn't be an issue in the museum I assume you're curating.

    Leave a comment:

  • rene
    Senior Member

  • rene
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Mac OS X dropped support for some older MacOS machines back in the day, so define "modern trend".
    I meant Linux kernel and X.org, since when is macOS any reference to measure things?

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  • Vistaus
    Senior Member

  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post

    Usually find car and airplane comparisons a bit out of place, and a nice BSD should be a useful options for yesteryears NAS, too. But sure, I noticed deleting support for yesteryears stuff is a hip and modern trend.
    Mac OS X dropped support for some older MacOS machines back in the day, so define "modern trend".

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  • boPt
    Junior Member

  • boPt
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post

    of course I know I can run my Linux on it ;-) though not exactly nice to drop support for ULV Atoms that just shipped some years ago – if Microsoft did things like this a decade ago everyone was crying fool, and said how much greater open source is due to older device support.
    Whether we agree with it or not, i386 deprecation has been in process for a long time. Folks that knowingly bought about to be obseleted hardware relatively recently don't get sympathy. ARM would appear to be the logical alternative for some time now.

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  • boPt
    Junior Member

  • boPt
    replied
    Originally posted by rene View Post
    not exactly amazing for people with nice vintage devices, such as the ultra portable Sony Vaio P: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suCj4eulTJg or Transmeta based OQO 01: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s22Rk1xW9ME
    I hate throwing away working hardware _but_ ARM are i386's lunch.

    Leave a comment:

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