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Trying DragonFlyBSD & FreeBSD On The Intel Core i9 9900K With ASUS PRIME Z390-A

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  • Trying DragonFlyBSD & FreeBSD On The Intel Core i9 9900K With ASUS PRIME Z390-A

    Phoronix: Trying DragonFlyBSD & FreeBSD On The Intel Core i9 9900K With ASUS PRIME Z390-A

    Since last month's Intel Core i9 9900K launch for this eight core / sixteen thread processor we have explored its performance for Linux gaming, how the performance and power efficiency go from the Intel 990X to 9900K, the Spectre mitigation costs, and the Intel Coffeelake Refresh performance across various Linux distributions. For those curious about using the new Intel CPUs and Z390 motherboards with one of the BSD operating systems, I spent a few days over the weekend trying out FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD releases with the i9-9900K and ASUS PRIME Z390-A motherboard combination.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=27084

  • #2
    the Intel Core i9 9900K makes realy no sense for me at all ... it costs here ~700€ the 2700x 299€

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gorgone View Post
      the Intel Core i9 9900K makes realy no sense for me at all ... it costs here ~700€ the 2700x 299€
      Intel processors haven’t made sense for a long time now.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by gorgone View Post
        the Intel Core i9 9900K makes realy no sense for me at all ... it costs here ~700€ the 2700x 299€
        The 9900k costs €603 here.

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        • #5
          If fsync on HAMMER2 truly is broken then performance on a lot of benchmarks is likely to get much worse if that is fixed.
          I guess that it depends on how much data you are willing to risk with a power failure of some sort.

          Benchmark it all without fsync?

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          • #6
            I consider DragonflyBSD to be the underdog, so any ties or wins, no matter how small, is a success for them. Not counting the write benchmark (fsync), the OpenSSL benchmark was the bestresult for DragonflyBSD.

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            • #7
              I really find these Go benchmarks interesting due to them using the same compiler and optimization across all systems (there are no optimization levels in the Go compiler), thus what is actually being compared here should be the impact of the underlying operating system and not different versions of compiler toolchains and different optimization levels used when building benchmarks.

              With that it is very interesting (and surprising) to see such big differences in the Linux distros on a CPU bound test like 'garbage collecting', with Clear Linux being ~15% faster than Fedora. I wouldn't mind seeing more Go benchmarks added to the OS/distro benchmarks.

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