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The Electrical Usage So Far This Summer For Linux Benchmarking

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  • #41
    Does anyone have any experience with fuel cells/hydrogen Electrolyser / photovoltaic systems ? If so opinion?

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    • #42
      [QUOTE=grigi;n891214]
      Originally posted by caligula View Post
      Um I think you have no idea what you're talking about. DC-DC converters are really cheap. For example a 95% efficient 1,5 kW converter from 8-60V to 12V is $16, including shipping.

      A DC-DC converter does not a PSU make...
      And then you have to spend the time to retrofit everything.
      DC-DC buck-boost and PicoPSU indeed make a PSU. They can power all the normal desktop systems except the ones with 75+ TDP CPU and 75W GPU (from the PCI-E bus). Maybe with driver tuning you could draw less power from PCI-E. Some systems don't have ATX socket, just 12V DC barrel. Disks, fans, pumps all use 12V.

      Also, you then need a DC solar system, which implies batteries and huge AC-DC power supply for when your batteries are running empty.
      Oh, and the much thicker cabling to now deliver ~8x the amperage.
      A DC solar system? All panels are DC, all batteries are DC. You can wire them directly without DC-AC-DC conversions.

      Yes, the current handling becomes a larger problem with 12V DC, but the distances aren't that large and you can split the load so that there are one or more panels per server.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by DDF420 View Post
        Does anyone have any experience with fuel cells/hydrogen Electrolyser / photovoltaic systems ? If so opinion?
        non-cryogenic hydrogen is a bitch to store, as it slowly escapes from enclosed containers due to tiny atomic size, and its density is also VERY low (same reason) so even if you compress it you don't get that much benefit off it.

        Also, electrolysis is a horribly energy-intensive process, and fuel cells aren't anywhere as efficient as a battery.

        Protip: Buy Tesla's PowerWall, bigass lithium-ion batteries. That's the best-in-class of battery technology right now. Also guaranteed to last a decade. In many places they make more money (i.e. pay themselves back faster) than solar by just recharging at night and discharging at day (if your contract has cheaper energy at night, that is).

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        • #44
          If cooling is a big cost in the summer, I suggest trying to organize the racks so that the hot exhaust air is brought straight outside by a duct.
          I guess you need to move things around a bit hand have temporary partition walls setup in the sumer time and then an exhaust fan and duct placed properly.

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          • #45
            The most efficient thing to do is to get the heat out of the house without using any more energy. The answer to that is setting up a thermal siphon/chimney. To make that work, all that's needed is a low vent to let air in and a high vent to let air out. Basically, construct a tube from the basement to the roof. The bottom should be located in the same room as the servers, and the top would ideally be near the roof peak with a cupola on top. A cupola will help a passing breeze to suck air out. For the air intake, an open window anywhere in the basement will work.

            Ideally the inside of the tube will be smooth to lessen the friction for the air, but that's not completely necessary. It also needs to be a reasonable size, like 2' x 2'. Perhaps you could drywall such a construction in the corner of a room; I don't know the layout of your house. The cupola would cool the attic, which tends to be very warm in a hot climate anyway, and you could just build a tube from the attic floor to the basement ceiling, letting the cupola cool the attic, too. Cupolas are cute. If you can't do a cupola, you may still be able to get good cross ventilation and thus air sucking by installing larger vents on the walls under the peaks of the roofs.

            http://sustainabilityworkshop.autode...llis-principle

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            • #46
              Solar does make sense in some locations. Like Southern California, for example. I'm not sure if Indiana is one of them, though.

              Michael definitely wouldn't need one of those batteries, though. He'd just be looking to offset as much power use as possible during the day, I don't think he'd have any extra power surplus to store.

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              • #47
                Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                Solar does make sense in some locations. Like Southern California, for example. I'm not sure if Indiana is one of them, though.
                productive solar panel installations planetside are horribly expensive and require non-trivial babysitting (not unlike any other power generation technology anyway).
                Buying a bunch of panels and attaching them to a roof isn't a "productive solar panel installation".

                Michael definitely wouldn't need one of those batteries, though. He'd just be looking to offset as much power use as possible during the day, I don't think he'd have any extra power surplus to store.
                Wrong, Micheael isn't a greenpeece fan, he just wants to pay less for electricity. (let's ingnore for a moment that batteries are better than panels given that baseline power generation has to be run anyway and if someone does not use it they have to waste it)
                If his contract isn't flat but electricity cost at day is higher than at night, these batteries would allow him to use electricity that he bought at night.
                If he covers the whole system with batteries, he would be basically paying all electricity as if he was using it at night.

                For many places that's not bad at all, and allows to return of the investment in less than a decade while panels rarely pay themselves in less than 2 decades.

                Panels = "green chic" choice, not cost-effective
                batteries = green choice, cost-effective

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