Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

[Request] A special Debian Stable performance test against other distros

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • [Request] A special Debian Stable performance test against other distros

    Given how the Stable releases of Debian won't change much in regards to performance (because of the same software being present on the entire life of the distro, for the vast majority of packages), I would like to ask you, Michael, to do a special kind of performance test.

    The thing I like about Debian is that they Backport a good amount of software to the Stable releases, as long as it's doable. And they do this until the end of the release life cycle, e.g. Debian Jessie should have "linux" or "mesa" backported from Sid/Testing until it reach it's EOL. Right now, the backported version of mesa is 11.1.2 and should change to 11.2.1 as soon as it leaves the Experimental repo (in contrast, the regular Stable release, without backports, has Mesa 10.3). https://packages.debian.org/jessie-b...s/libegl1-mesa

    The purpose of this test is to see how the "good-ol Debian Stable" holds in regards to performance when compared to newer distros that have similar drivers/Kernel. Is Debian Stable + Backports just as good as Debian Testing/Sid - or Ubuntu, Fedora, Arch - when it comes to gaming? Or is it better to just use Debian Testing?

    Cheers.

  • debianxfce
    replied
    You can test debian stable easily: Install Unigine Heaven to your main ssd. Copy debian live iso to a fast memory card and boot with it and run the benchmark. Compare fps to your current system.

    When I was searching for the os for several computers, I wanted it to: have Xfce, small disk usage, not be a derivate (more code more bugs, keep it simple), easy to install and maintain, have compatibility with other software, be widely used and well supported. Later I wanted it to be a rolling release distro, because with testing you can use packages from stable, unstable and experimental and use upgrades when ever you want.

    To speed up debian, use Xfce, make a custom kernel that matches your hardware and disable unneeded systemd services.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X