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Tiling The Linux Benchmarking Server Room For Lower Temperatures

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  • Uqbar
    replied
    Originally posted by Ferdinand View Post
    Because black absorbs more sun light? How does color impact how much heat it transfers?
    If the stuff in the server room started generating heat in the form of visible light, then the color of the tiling (as well as the one of the walls and ceiling) could affect the thermal status.
    But in that case, I fear, Michael would have some major problem with the equipment. The heat we normally experience comes in the form of infrared and red photons (about 400 Celsius degrees). To get it visible and thus subject to visual coloring we'd reach twice (and more) the temperature.
    Sun's yellow "temperature" is about 1000 Celsius degrees and it's subject to different absorption levels accordingly to visual coloring.
    Then, absorption and reflection (and visual coloring) has little to do with heat transfer. Very very little, if any.
    I hope Michael's heat will keep staying invisible. For the sake of his business and house!
    Even if Michael is willing to keep is business "hot" and his house "cool" in a sense other than thermal. :-)

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  • lvlark
    replied
    Originally posted by Uqbar View Post
    There are also other technologies, but the margin of this post is too small to fit the discussion.
    I giggled. Though you really should've given four techniques before the reference.

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  • Ferdinand
    replied
    Originally posted by Herem View Post

    That's odd the article only had text the first time I viewed it.

    The reason I mentioned using black or a dark color tile is just because darker tiles would absorb heat more efficiently.
    Because black absorbs more sun light? How does color impact how much heat it transfers?

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  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by l8gravely View Post
    Seeing your other post on water cooling for some of your systems, would it make sense to use water cooling on your systems? Put some copped pipe out back in the ground below the frost line and just run the heat out there, ala heat pump style. I do suspect that as others have said, the tiles will make it feel cooler down there, but might just shift the load so that you have a slightly offset peak heat effect.

    Maybe you need to move further north? :-)
    Too expensive for water cooling all the systems, plus a big pain to maintain and install.

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  • Uqbar
    replied
    Originally posted by l8gravely View Post
    Maybe you need to move further north? :-)
    All the way up north east!

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  • l8gravely
    replied
    Seeing your other post on water cooling for some of your systems, would it make sense to use water cooling on your systems? Put some copped pipe out back in the ground below the frost line and just run the heat out there, ala heat pump style. I do suspect that as others have said, the tiles will make it feel cooler down there, but might just shift the load so that you have a slightly offset peak heat effect.

    Maybe you need to move further north? :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Uqbar
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    I run a dehumidifer all summer.
    Humidity rises the thermal capacity of the hair. Effective dehumidifiers are just "light air conditioners" as they cool the air in order to let humidity condense in droplets that got dained away.
    Why not using an air conditioner plus a tilting fan ventilator? Maybe two of them in different corners of the room. AC alone won't help as heat bubbles will form.

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  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Flan Solo View Post
    Uqbar is exactly right. The difference in r-value between the original vinyl plus underlayment and the new porcelain tiles is negligible - both have r-values less than 1.0 while, code for floor insulation r-value is at least 13 and up to 30 depending on where you live. Removing the underlayment may also be problematic since it was your moisture barrier. You may find the room is just as hot as before and now more humid, so even less pleasant for a human.
    I run a dehumidifer all summer.

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  • Uqbar
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
    In Michael's case the goal is not glowing & radiating, just conducting heat down to the concrete.
    Conducting heat to concrete won't help either. Concrete is not a good heat conductor at all. In fact, it's a very good heat insulator.
    Bare concrete would not be any better than tiled concrete, once you reach the thermal equilibrium.
    If it's a "vibrated concrete", then insulation would be even greater also for humidity, so there would be almost none transmitted from the underlying soil.
    Moreover, soil temperature a few feet in depth tend to be really stable and higher than expected.
    Thousands of server rooms all follows the same rules:
    1. Cooling the air in the room with air conditioning;
    2. Making the lower temperature as uniform as possible all over the room with ventilation;
    3. Dissipate the heat from the hot side of the "heat exchanger" as far as possible from the room.

    There are also other technologies, but the margin of this post is too small to fit the discussion.
    I could be wrong, but Michael just wasted a rather large amount of money: Marazzi is very expensive. Yet really COOL! :-)

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  • Flan Solo
    replied
    Uqbar is exactly right. The difference in r-value between the original vinyl plus underlayment and the new porcelain tiles is negligible - both have r-values less than 1.0 while, code for floor insulation r-value is at least 13 and up to 30 depending on where you live. Removing the underlayment may also be problematic since it was your moisture barrier. You may find the room is just as hot as before and now more humid, so even less pleasant for a human.

    In your original article you said a "a split cooling system not being suitable due to the basement layout" without elaborating. As someone who installed a mini-split in my finished basement, that seems extremely unlikely to me. Mini-splits use thin lines for refrigerant that are relatively easy to route as compared to ductwork.

    In the previous discussion, someone calculated you are doing about 14K BTU/hr. In your situation I would seriously consider an ~18K BTU/hr mini-split -- unlike with other forms of HVAC it is OK to mildly over-size mini-splits since they use variable speed inverters to efficiently match load requirements and 18K would give you some head-room for expansion.

    Equipment cost would be in the $1.5K-2.5K range (depending on the brand) and it sounds like you could do most of the install yourself since you have some construction experience, only paying ~$200 for an HVAC guy to pressurize the lines.

    Mini-splits have pretty high efficiency, you should be able to find one with a 19+ SEER and cooling COP of 3.5+ (1 watt to move 3.5 watts of heat).


    FWIW, walking on tile feels colder than walking on carpet because your bare feet make full contact while carpet has a lot of air spaces in it so heat transfer from your skin is less because there is less area of contact, not because carpet is a better insulator.
    Last edited by Flan Solo; 01 February 2016, 09:09 AM.

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